Is Your Cup Half Full, or Half Empty?

BEING able to manifest positive emotions and happiness “is perhaps one of the greatest gifts you have been given as a human being,” writes Dr. Joseph M. Mercola, a prominent alternative medicine advocate.

“But to some extent, being happy is a choice you need to make,” he says, “much like choosing to exercise or eat right. Happiness comes from within — it’s not meted out by circumstance alone.”

Karma is a word of many meanings, and has a special term for almost every one of its aspects according to Theosophy.

As a synonym of sin, an action for the attainment of worldly, selfish desire, “it cannot fail to be hurtful” to almost everyone.  Yet karma is also “the law of ethical causation,” Theosophical Pioneer William Q. Judge wrote. The effect of an act produced egotistically, against the great law of harmony which depends on altruism not selfishness.

In reality the condition is not inevitable. “No one has a right to say that he can do nothing for others, on any pretext whatever,” Blavatsky insists in her Key to Theosophy. The poor widow in the Synoptic Gospels gives everything she had, she points out, while others give only a small portion of their own wealth.

“A cup of cold water given in time to a thirsty wayfarer is a nobler duty and more worth than a dozen dinners given away, out of season, to men who can afford to pay for them.”

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Following Mme. Blavatsky’s death in 1891, an editorial published in the New York Daily Tribune (founded by Horace Greeley) said of her: “Madame Blavatsky held that the regeneration of mankind must be based upon the development of altruism. In this she was at one with the greatest thinkers, not alone of the present day, but of all time,” the Editorial acknowledges.

“And, it is becoming more and more apparent, at one with the strongest spiritual tendencies of the age.

“This alone would entitle her teachings to the candid and serious consideration of all who respect the influences that make for righteousness.”

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Theosophy vs Modern Science, Exploding Modern Theories

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Comets Are NOT Dirty Snowballs

THE major theosophical agitators of modern scientific consensus theories are the subjects of evolution, physics, space, matter and consciousness.

Light says occultism is a substance, space is not a vacuum, matter is conscious, gravity is a minor law, we didn’t evolve from animals, and the atom is infinitely divisible, (& etc).

The infinitely divisibility of the atom argued by H. P. Blavatsky in The Secret Doctrine (1:519), was finally accepted into the turn of the 20th Century. Heaping puzzlement on criticism she adds, however, that the atom “belongs wholly to the domain of metaphysics:”

“It is an entified abstraction — at any rate for physical Science — and has nought to do with physics, strictly speaking.” (The Masks of Science)

But perhaps the most provocative idea of all, and the one most vigorously promoted by Theosophy, is the electrical underpinning of the universe.  Cosmologists will still not relinquish their death grip on gravity — hopefully this is changing, thanks to the EU.

The theory of gravity remains the predominant cosmological hypothesis today. Electricity is sometimes considered but its effects are usually minimized electrical universe (EU) proponents point out.

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Plasma field or hot gas?

The dispute is explored in the article Electric Charge vs. Hot Gas posted this month by The Thunderbolts Project, the website of the new Electrical Universe science. Einstein’s moving masses and heat are still the only factors allowed to operate in the universe.

Electric charge is sometimes considered, but it is usually negligible in its effect, if it has any effect at all, say the EU scientists.

In previous Picture of the Day articles, it was noted that charged particles streaming from stars like the Sun are still called a “wind” instead of calling them electric and magnetic currents, all in support of the gravity-only theory. Real substance is what Mme. Blavatsky referred to as “phlogiston“(called plasma today), or “radiant matter” — the “fourth state” of matter, so called.

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Science was Spiritual, and Religion was Scientific

WE live on a planet constantly in motion, and except for the occasional natural catastrophe, it is usually a very slow, orderly motion.

The Earth is billions of years old and still in the making—glacial cycles come and go, continents move, mountains form and crumble. Yet Life persists.

Modern Science has, for decades, tried to sell us every soulless theory they could, from the ‘big bang,’ to the chemical origin of life, and a gravity-driven universe.

Our current dogmatic science ought to fear approaching the problem of life’s origins. Their hypothetical models always postulate random events, and chance mutations, in a hostile universe — a cosmos without conscience, consciousness or spiritual life.

All new theories lead up blind alleys. How Earth formed, how life arose. All we are offered is endless speculation, and the stunningly unscientific approach that, instead of welcoming new ideas, refuses to follow where the evidence leads.

And what life is in its most essential essence, continues to be the most ignored problem in science.

The mainstream theorists have so far been content with a soulless stew of blind matter, which has neither intelligent design or purpose. But these have led nowhere in explaining the many mysteries hidden in everyday life.

In stark contrast, Theosophy teaches that ‘life’ did not have to be created, but is a universal principle, and underlies the universe both macro and micro. Life only ‘arises’ to our attention according to science under rigid conditions.

“Life must conform to a chance based material worldview, measurable by laboratory instruments, and judged by our human physical senses.”

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But life is really a dynamic interaction between the forces of spirit, mind and matter, Theosophy says, and develops its forms via patterns embedded in an indwelling, divine evolutionary plan.  A great mystery recently was discovered challenging the foundations of modern scientific principles.

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Near Death Journeys into the Afterlife

WHEN a neurosurgeon found himself in a coma, he experienced things he never thought possible—a journey to the afterlife.

“Dr. Eben Alexander says he’s not the first person to have discovered evidence that consciousness exists beyond the body,” notes Newsweek Magazine in a feature article.

“Brief, wonderful glimpses of this realm are as old as human history.”

“Modern physics tells us that the universe is a unity—that it is undivided,” Dr. Alexander wrote in the Newsweek October 15 2012 cover story.

“Though we seem to live in a world of separation and difference,” he writes, “science tells us that beneath the surface, every object and event in the universe is completely woven up with every other object and event. There is no true separation.”

“In some sense man is a microcosm of the universe,” wrote David Bohm — legendary American quantum physicist known for his theory of an Implicate Order,” a universe of undivided wholeness—”therefore what man is, is a clue to the universe.”

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“We are enfolded in the universe,” Bohm says. Theosophy agrees. “We know of no eastern philosophy that teaches that ‘matter originated out of Spirit,’ Blavatsky wrote:

“Matter is as eternal and indestructible as Spirit and one cannot be made cognizant to our senses without the other—even to our, the highest, spiritual sense.”

Theosophy also asserts what neurologists and physicists are now beginning to verify — that there is no special location of consciousness in the brain. Consciousness exists throughout the brain, and the body.

The mind actually lives independently with its own energetic matrix interpenetrating the physical body, using the brain, heart and other organs and cells as its toolkit on this plane.

“Spirit got itself entangled with gross matter,” Blavatsky wrote in The Theosophist, “for the same reason that life gets entangled with the foetus matter. It followed a law, and therefore could not help the entanglement occurring.”

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Proof of the Soul thru Dreams

WRESTING consciousness from the lords of scientific reductionism, where its mysteries have languished for decades, takes imaginative and fearless warriors.

Not surprisingly, the acclaimed Father of Modern Philosophy, René Descartes, cannot be authenticated as a combatant truth seeker.

Descartes held that non-human creatures must be reductively assumed to be nothing but mere automatons, signaling a tired materialism, not frontier science.

The Cartesian assumptions do not sit well with animal welfare advocates, environmentalists, especially not Theosophists who insist that consciousness is endemic to all kingdoms of nature, not just the human.

Possessors of sentient consciousness include, Theosophy says, such unlikely candidates as bacteria, minerals — and yes, even atoms!

Descartes held rigidly to the premise “I think therefore I am”— without ever explaining what a thought is, or explaining the ever-elusive, dogged persistence of consciousness. Whether awake or asleep, comatose or vegetative, its presence is in-dismissible.

One wonders if it doesn’t seem far more reasonable to assume in fact that the opposite is true, i.e. —I AM, therefore I think?”

Adherents biassedly line up on one or the other side of the issue. (Actually, Theosophy could argue both sides are accounted for by its teaching of the mind’s dual nature.)

In fact, the elusive, omnipersistent ‘mind’, is not a production of the brain at all, but an aspect of universal mind.

Over one hundred years ago, unraveling the mystery of the existence of the ‘soul’ was attempted by physical science, employing of course the expected material, reductionist methods — using a mechanical device to weigh it!

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Science vs Religion – and the Winner is?

Girl-magnifying-glassTHE late world-renowned evolutionary biologist Lynn Margulis was one of those rare scientists who was “spiritually-minded” in the Theosophical sense.

Margulis wrote a paper “that many biologists at the time regarded as a wild evolutionary heresy,” Steven Rose reports in the guardian.co.uk, “but which has now become mainstream.”

“Typical of mainstream, she waited for more than 10 years to be vindicated.”

“Margulis expanded on an idea that co-operation is as important a feature of evolutionary change as competition,” Rose explained.  Its a view “that Charles Darwin himself would not have been unsympathetic to,” he comments, “despite the protestations of some of his more fundamentalist disciples.”

But the introduction of a sea change in Science is seldom welcome, and the new birth more often than not is accompanied by trauma and hot denial, precisely what New Age Mother H. P. Blavatsky expected and endured. “All truth passes through three stages,” Arthur Schopenhauer, the German Philosopher, notably declared: 

“First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.”

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“It is very difficult for a materialist, the metaphysical portion of whose brain is almost atrophied,” Blavatsky explains  in her dialogue, “to raise himself— or for one who is naturally spiritually-minded, to descend to the level of the matter-of-fact vulgar thought.”

When the high priests of material science “resolve consciousness into a secretion from the grey matter of the brain, and everything else in nature into a mode of motion,” she asserted, “we protest against the doctrine as being un-philosophical.”

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Practical Theosophy is not one Science, but embraces every science in life, moral and physical,” she notes in The Secret Doctrine (1:269), and “it is clear that modern science believes not in the ‘soul of things.

And she went on to assert that scientists would eventually be driven out of their position, “not by spiritual, theosophical, or any other physical or even mental phenomena, but simply by the enormous gaps and chasms that open daily — and will still be opening before them.”

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The Top 10 Secrets of Magic and Occult Science

“THREE decades ago, few scientists were courageous enough to break ranks and question their own belief system,” Deepak Chopra writes.

“Even calling science a belief system sounded outrageous – religion is a matter of belief, science a matter of facts.”

What follows are excerpts from Deepak Chopra’s recent article in the San Francisco Chronicle SFGate – Dr. Rupert Sheldrake’s top 10 list on Scientific Ideology – and H. P. Blavatsky’s “Ten Items” of natural law in Isis Unveiled (Vol. 2:588), called “the fundamental propositions of the Oriental philosophy.”

“The most far-seeing scientist who was willing to break ranks then, as now, was Rupert Sheldrake, who risked his impeccable credentials as a Cambridge biochemist with real joy, like a man suddenly able to breathe.

“Thirty years after his first heretical books, Sheldrake’s new one, ‘Science Set Free’ is a landmark achievement. No science writing has inspired me more.”

“Sheldrake’s essential point is that science needs setting free from ten blind dogmas. These dogmas embrace a true belief system as much as Roman Catholicism or any other faith. Behind the daily activity of gathering data, science assumes certain things about reality that, according to Sheldrake, are unsupportable.

“The first dogma, for example, holds that the universe is mechanical. If that is so, then everything in the universe is also mechanical, including human beings – or to use a phrase from the noted atheist Richard Dawkins, we are ‘lumbering robots.’

“From a scientist’s perspective, to understand everything that you need to know about human beings, you only have to tinker with all the mechanical parts of genes and the brain until there are no more secrets left.”

“Clearly such a view leaves no room for the soul, which becomes a wispy illusion that needs to be swept away. But then, so does the self, because there is no region of the brain that contains ‘I,’ a person.

“As long as ‘I’ is a hallucination formed by complex neural circuitry, one can throw out – or reduce to mechanical operations – love, beauty, truth, compassion, honor, devotion, faith, and so on, the whole apparatus that makes a person’s life feel valuable. A random universe has no purpose; therefore, giving lumbering robots a purpose is dubious.”

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