Tag Archives: Daniel Tammet

Wired Together

crystal-sightsPERSISTENT paradoxy seems to be our fate as human beings, almost our defining characteristic.

Compassionate and forgiving one moment, the next we are burdened with irreconcilable differences and conflicts.

Yet to experience any of these contrasting states (or that we interact at all) is made possible because we are connected.

We are fundamentally entwined with one another like a forest of giant redwoods that have intermingling root systems.

And beyond humanity, “everything in the Universe, throughout all its kingdoms, is conscious,” H. P. Blavatsky maintained in The Secret Doctrine (1:274).

Not just the greater kingdoms, but every entity in them “is endowed with a consciousness of its own kind, and on its own plane of perception.”

Scientists have even connected minerals, linking “two diamonds in a mysterious process called entanglement,” LiveScience senior writer Clara Moskowitz reports —”normally only seen on the quantum scale.”

“Thus, no speck of dust or grain of sand is without its own quality of consciousness,” insists Gertrude W. van Pelt in Hierarchies: The Ladder of Life, “though, of course, not as human beings understand the word. In this sense every atom is an entity,”

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“Every composite being is composed of atoms,” she notes, “which obviously could not be used or respond to impulses if they were not themselves alive, having their own degree of consciousness.”

“If there were not this essential unity, there could be no coordination in nature, and any broken link would mean chaos.”

It has been found that the power of prescience lies ready to spring out from the core of even the simplest entities on earth, from atoms to molecules. Cells at disparate locations in our bodies, for example, will talk to one other. Trees are known to warn other trees of insect attacks over long distances.

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Wired Minds

Mnemosyne mother of the Muses

THOUGH burdened by  irreconcilable differences and conflicts,  humans are nonetheless bound together like a forest of giant redwoods, whose roots are inseparably entwined.

Everyone of us has the potential, more or less developed to peer into the ‘soul of things,’ experiencing the hidden essence of everything and everyone around us.

Often appearing as ‘gut feelings’ we clearly don’t pay enough heed to that ability, favoring instead left-brain intellectual activity.

It is taught that the intuitional power of prescience lies ready to spring from the core of even the simplest entities like atoms and bacteria.

Billions of cells at disparate locations in our bodies, for example, talk to one other, and trees are known to warn other trees of insect attacks over long distances.

Proofs of entanglement is seen in many animals who sense earthquakes and volcanic eruptions in advance — the same power demonstrated that dogs that invariably know when their owners are coming home.

These phenomena relate a core teaching in Theosophy that consciousness is universal, and there is no such thing as ‘empty space.’

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Billions of bacteria, called the human microbiome, are distributed over the entire human body. Except for gut bacteria it  is still a mystery to science why these communities of bacteria exist, and what their function, and are the subject of extensive investigation.

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Threads of Genius

UNDERSTANDING the how and why of human uniqueness, from the likes of Mozart to the fearless passion of Julia Butterfly Hill, will always be perplexing.

Lacking a seer’s knowingness, we’d be forced to trudge for clues into the far horizons of reincarnation, and sift the karmic sands of countless past lives.

Teilhard de Chardin’s idea that we are “spiritual beings immersed in a human experience,” hardly explains Mozart composing music at age three.

Or why Julia, at twenty-four years old, would opt to spend a dangerous two years alone atop a giant redwood, protecting it from angry, clear-cutting loggers.

We all sport a convincing sense of individual identity. This is the “I am I” consciousness, and is our immortal soul that hovers, hawk-like — silently and all-seeing — above the Salton Sea of each new personality.

Trauma patients with memory loss are convinced of their egoity, even if they don’t know exactly who they might be. Amnesiacs may forget their own name, family, email, and favorite movie — but their sense of ‘I’ persists.

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Horizons of the Mind

 

Mnemosyne - mother of the Muses

THOUGH often burdened by  irreconcilable differences and conflicts, human beings live, like a forest of giant redwoods,  entwined together at the roots.

Everyone of us has the potential, more or less developed, to peer into the ‘soul of things,’ experiencing their hidden essence.

Often appearing as ‘gut feelings’ we clearly don’t pay enough heed to that ability, favoring reason instead.

And, it is taught that the power of prescience lies ready to spring at the core of even the simplest entities, from atoms to ants.

Cells at disparate locations in our bodies, for example, will talk to one other, and trees are known to warn other trees of insect attacks over long distances.

Many animals can sense earthquakes and volcanic eruptions in advance, and it is demonstrated that dogs know when their owners are coming home.

These phenomena are of the fundamental teachings in Theosophy, i.e. consciousness is universal, and necessary to the survival of life. 

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