Tag Archives: evolution

Proved Not by Chance: Life Intelligently Designed and Guided

yucca-campestrisMODERN evolution is one of the most elaborate scientific frauds of all time. The fraud consists in a conscious refusal to accept any kind of design in Nature.

This is kissing cousin to the disparaged argument of irreducible complexity.

Irreducible complexity, the principle proposed by biologist Michael Behe, declares that certain biological systems are too complex to have evolved by chance.

(See: Darwin’s Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution)

Modern evolution calls upon “natural selection,” acting on a series of chance mutations from simpler, or “less complete” predecessors.

Says Theosophy: The behaviors and mechanisms of these systems has to have been “designed” by some oversight intelligence.

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Soul Lessons of Love, Pain and Happiness

degas-dancersEVOLUTION as defined in the teachings of Theosophy is a multifaceted venture, a dance of spirit, soul, mind and matter.

True and lasting self-knowledge is acquired gradually in both loving and painful experiences, through a long, yet ultimately finite series of reincarnations in human form.

Such transitions occur within a triple evolutionary plan, Blavatsky wrote, and are “inextricably interwoven and interblended at every point.”

The key to our spiritual development lies in recognizing the unity and continuity of life, Theosophy says — and that for the soul, there is really no such thing as final extinction. We are first and foremost spiritual beings, and humanity is our field of necessary human experience.

But what happens to our human self after death? Does everything important, our consciousness and love, die with the body? Blavatsky, writing in The Key to Theosophy, assures her students that love and spirit are immortal. And further, that:

“Death comes to our spiritual selves ever as a deliverer and friend.”

Self-knowledge evolves gradually out of the recognition, as the philosopher-mystic Teilhard de Chardin famously said, we are “spiritual beings having a human experience,” not the other way around.

Our afterlife, once the dissolution of the body and Earthly desire body is complete, is blissful. That state “consists in our complete conviction that we never left the earth,” Blavatsky writes in the Key to Theosophy, “and that there is no such thing as death at all.”

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The Earth does not Revolve around The Sun

solarwavesOUR vast solar system is vast only when not compared with the still greater aggregation of stars and planets around it.

“The great sidereal year covered by the sun in going through the twelve signs of the zodiac includes over 25,000 mortal years of 365 days each.

“And we may imagine — for there are no [physical] observations on the point — that, while the 25,000 years of travel around the zodiac have been passing, the solar system as a whole has advanced along the sun’s own orbit only a little distance.

“While this immense circuit is being traversed, the sun drags the whole solar system with him around his own tremendous orbit.”

“But after millions of years shall have been consumed in these progresses, the sun must bring his train of planets to stellar space where they have never been before.

“Here other conditions and combinations of matter may very well obtain — conditions and states of which our scientists have never heard, of which there never has been recorded one single phenomenon; and the difference between planetary conditions then and now will be so great that no resemblance shall be observed. William Q. Judge, Echoes from the Orient, Ch. 5

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How to Get Unstuck from Your Illness

KARMA is a word of many meanings, and has a special term for almost every one of its aspects according to Theosophy.

As a synonym of sin, an action for the attainment of worldly, selfish desire, “it cannot fail to be hurtful” to almost everyone.

Yet karma is “the law of ethical causation,” the effect of an act produced egotistically, against the great law of harmony which depends on altruism not selfishness.

In reality the condition is not inevitable. “No one has a right to say that he can do nothing for others, on any pretext whatever,” the spiritual theosophical teacher H. P. Blavatsky insists.

The poor widow in the Synoptic Gospels gives everything she had, she points out, while others give only a small portion of their own wealth. Always, “a cup of cold water given in time to a thirsty wayfarer is a nobler duty and more worth than a dozen dinners given away, out of season, to men who can afford to pay for them,” she says.

Following Mme. Blavatsky’s death in 1891, an editorial published in the New York Daily Tribune (founded by Horace Greeley) said of her: “Madame Blavatsky held that the regeneration of mankind must be based upon the development of altruism. In this she was at one with the greatest thinkers, not alone of the present day, but of all time,” the Editorial acknowledges.

“And, it is becoming more and more apparent, at one with the strongest spiritual tendencies of the age.

“This alone would entitle her teachings to the candid and serious consideration of all who respect the influences that make for righteousness.”

The clearest statements of Blavatsky’s ethical views, are in The Key to Theosophy (Section 12), where she insists that “altruism is an integral part of self-development.” It is man’s duty “to give all that which is wholly his own and can benefit no one but himself, if he selfishly keeps it from others,” she wrote.

Asked how a person could achieve such an elevated state, her reply focused on four overarching aspects: “By the use of our higher reason, spiritual intuition and moral sense, and by following the dictates of what we call ‘the still small voice’ of our conscience —

“…and which speaks louder in us than the earthquakes and the thunders of Jehovah.”

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The Miracle of Miracles, the Great Inscrutable Mystery

Botticelli: Primavera

Botticelli: Primavera

WE are repulsed by a beheading, David Brooks writes in a recent NY Times Op Ed, “because the body has a spiritual essence.”

“The human head and body don’t just live and pass along genes. They paint, make ethical judgments, savor the beauty of a sunset and experience the transcendent.” Further:

“The body is material but surpasses the material. It’s spiritualized matter.”

“Most of us, religious or secular,” Brooks writes in The Body and the Spirit, “have some instinctive sense that there is a ghost infused in the machine. And because the human body is a transcendent temple it is worthy of respect. It is offensive to treat it the way you would treat an inanimate object.”

“Even after a person is dead, the body still carries the residue of this presence and deserves dignified handling.”

Similarly H. P. Blavatsky noted, quoting Carlyle and Novalis: “we touch heaven when we lay our hand on a human body! … How does our physical body come to the state of perfection it is found in now?,” she asks and answers: “Through millions of years of evolution, of course, yet never through, or from, animals, as taught by materialism.”

“For, as Carlyle says: — ‘The essence of our being, the mystery in us that calls itself  ‘I,’ — what words have we for such things? — it is a breath of Heaven, the highest Being reveals himself in man. This body, these faculties, this life of ours, is it not all as a vesture for the unnamed?'”

Botticelli, Birth of Venus

Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus

“The breath of heaven, or rather the breath of life is, as Novalis said, and no one since has said it better, as repeated by Carlyle: —

“There is but one temple in the universe, and that is the body of man. Nothing is holier than that high form . . . . We touch heaven when we lay our hand on a human body!” (Secret Doctrine 1:211-12)

“If well meditated it will turn out to be a scientific fact — the expression of the actual truth of the thing. We are the miracle of miracles — the great inscrutable Mystery,” She continues. The breath of heaven, or rather the breath of life, called in the bible Nephesh, is in every animal, in every animate speck as in every mineral atom.”

human-anatomy-07

Intelligent Design

Worth repeating:

“But none of these has, like man, the consciousness of the nature of that highest Being, as none has that divine harmony in its form which man possesses. There is but one temple in the universe, and that is the body of man. Nothing is holier than that high form.”

“We touch heaven when we lay our hand on a human body! This sounds like a mere flourish of rhetoric but it is not so.”

“If well meditated it will turn out to be a scientific fact — the expression of the actual truth of the thing. We are the miracle of miracles — the great inscrutable Mystery.”  (Thomas Carlyle, Ch. 1 Hero as Divinity)

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Yucca and Pronuba, Modern Evolution’s Kiss of Death

yucca-campestrisMODERN evolution is one of the most elaborate scientific frauds of all time. The fraud consists in a conscious refusal to accept any kind of design in Nature.

This is kissing cousin to the disparaged argument of irreducible complexity.

Irreducible complexity, the principle proposed by biologist Michael Behe, declares that certain biological systems are too complex to have evolved by chance.

(See: Darwin’s Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution)

Modern evolution calls upon “natural selection,” acting on a series of chance mutations from simpler, or “less complete” predecessors.

Says Theosophy: The behaviors and mechanisms of these systems has to have been “designed” by some oversight intelligence.

The argument of irreducible complexity is central to intelligent design, and is an argument rejected by the scientific community at large, which overwhelmingly regards any planning intelligence in Nature as pseudoscience.

Updated and republished at:

Proved Not by Chance: Life Intelligently Designed and Guided

One Absolutely Fundamental Law in the Universe

Baton_US-relay-teamTHAT modern saying ‘what goes around comes around’ is almost certainly a instinctive memory of karma, the omnipresent law of the universe.

The wisdom of karma insists that every fleeting moment eventually returns, like a relay race, to its original place plus the experience gained. And this law is an obligatory pilgrimage for everyone.

The theosophical universal law of evolution insists that every person’s actions whether good or bad,” as Wikipedia has it, “will often have consequences for that person.” And the consequences, we could add, include everyone in the human race and nature as a whole.

The ancients always insisted on the absolute universality of periodicity, the law “of flux and reflux, ebb and flow,” according to The Secret Doctrine, “which physical science has observed and recorded in all departments of nature.”

“An alternation such as that of Day and Night, Life and Death, Sleeping and Waking, is a fact so common, so perfectly universal and without exception,,” says this teaching, “that it is easy to comprehend that in it we see one of the absolutely fundamental laws of the universe.”

Child-merrygoround

This teaching is set forth in The Secret Doctrine as the Second Fundamental Proposition, a universal law sourced from the Perennial Philosophy (on which the teachings are based):

A metaphor “will convey the idea still more clearly,” Mme. Blavatsky wrote about the basics of the teaching (Volume 1, p. 2): “the out-breathing of the ‘unknown essence’ produces the world; and an inhalation causes it to disappear.”

“This process has been going on from all eternity, and our present universe is but one of an infinite series, which had no beginning and will have no end.”

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