Tag Archives: Gita

The Silent Center

THE Sanskrit word “Dharana” is defined as “the intense and perfect concentration of the mind upon some one interior object.”

This intense focus is “accompanied by complete abstraction from everything pertaining to the external Universe, or the world of the senses.”

Further, The Voice of the Silence instructs its aspiring students: “from the stronghold of your Soul, chase all your foes away—ambition, anger, hatred, e’en to the shadow of desire—when even you have failed.”

The devotional books Light on the Path, (“Kill out ambition…”), and The Voice of the Silence,  (“let the Disciple slay the Slayer”), are metaphors for self-control as we pursue a spiritual path.

Similarly, the setting of the Bhagavad-Gita is on the plain of a great battlefield called “Kurukshetra.” This plain is considered sacred, and is symbolic, W. Q. Judge says in his essay, “of the body which is acquired by karma.”

This metaphorical “killing” or “slaying,” is not contrary to the Buddhist and Hindu doctrine of “Ahimsa” (harmlessness). It refers rather to inner control over our physical senses, ambition, intellect, etc.—and to resolving our personal karmic challenges, including non-violence and non-separateness.

Dharana, or focused meditation, is all about slowing the ‘mental noise,’ or what is called the ‘monkey mind,’ and regaining our lost rulership.

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Our spiritual soul is the silent center, according to this old teaching, and for this True Self to always be in charge, it must be the ever-present decision maker in our lives.

Thus the Voice of the Silence teaches a paradoxical doctrine in which the intellectual, striving and desire-ridden mind, becomes its own savior through its higher counterpart, the light of intuition—the soul-mind—accompanied by occult sound vibrations:

“The Mind is the great Slayer of the Real.
Let the Disciple slay the Slayer.”

for…

“…when to himself his form appears unreal, as do on waking all the forms he sees in dreams–when he has ceased to hear the many, he may discern the ONE  the inner sound which kills the outer.”

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The Soul Center

THE Sanskrit word “Dharana” is defined as “the intense and perfect concentration of the mind upon some one interior object.”

This intense focus is “accompanied by complete abstraction from everything pertaining to the external Universe, or the world of the senses.”

Further, The Voice of the Silence instructs its aspiring students: “from the stronghold of your Soul, chase all your foes away — ambition, anger, hatred, e’en to the shadow of desire — when even you have failed.”

The devotional books Light on the Path, (“Kill out ambition…”), and The Voice of the Silence,  (“let the Disciple slay the Slayer”), are metaphors for self-control as we pursue a spiritual path.

Similarly, the setting of the Bhagavad-Gita is on the plain of a great battlefield called “Kurukshetra.” This plain is considered sacred, and is symbolic, W. Q. Judge says in his essay, “of the body which is acquired by karma.”

This metaphorical “killing” or “slaying,” is not contrary to the Buddhist and Hindu doctrine of “Ahimsa” (harmlessness). It refers rather to inner control over our physical senses, ambition, intellect, etc.—and to resolving our personal karmic challenges, including non-violence and non-separateness.

Dharana, or focused meditation, is all about slowing the ‘mental noise,’ or what is called the ‘monkey mind,’ and regaining our lost rulership.

ς

Our spiritual soul is the silent center, according to this old teaching, and for this True Self to always be in charge, it must be the ever-present decision maker in our lives.

Thus the Voice of the Silence teaches a paradoxical doctrine in which the intellectual, striving and desire-ridden mind, becomes its own savior through its higher counterpart, the light of intuition—the soul-mind—accompanied by occult sound vibrations:

“The Mind is the great Slayer of the Real.
Let the Disciple slay the Slayer.”

for…

“…when to himself his form appears unreal, as do on waking all the forms he sees in dreams–when he has ceased to hear the many, he may discern the ONE  the inner sound which kills the outer.”

Continue reading

Inside the Now

“THE idea that things can cease to exist and still be, is a fundamental one in Eastern psychology.

“Under this apparent contradiction in terms, there rests a fact of Nature to realize is the important thing.

“A familiar instance of a similar paradox is afforded by chemical combination. The question whether Hydrogen and Oxygen cease to exist, when they combine to form water, is still a moot one.

“Some [argue] that since they are found again when the water is decomposed, they must be there all the while—others contending that as they actually turn into something totally different, they must cease to exist as themselves for the time being.

“Neither side is able to form the faintest conception of the real condition of a thing, which has become something else, and yet has not ceased to be itself.

“Existence as water may be said to be, for Oxygen and Hydrogen, a state of Non-being which is ‘more real being’ than their existence as gases. And it may faintly symbolize the condition of the Universe when it goes to sleep, or ceases to be —

“… to awaken or reappear again, when the dawn of the new [Universe] recalls it to what we call existence.”

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The above might have been written by one of today’s frontier physicists or cosmologist visionaries. Instead, they are the words of Theosophical thought leader H. P. Blavatsky, excerpted from her magnum opus The Secret Doctrine, containing the ultimate teachings of occult meta-metaphysics.

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Jnana Yoga

THE Sanskrit word “Dharana” is defined as “the intense and perfect concentration of the mind upon some one interior object.”

This intense focus is “accompanied by complete abstraction from everything pertaining to the external Universe, or the world of the senses.”

Further, The Voice of the Silence instructs its aspiring students: “from the stronghold of your Soul, chase all your foes away—ambition, anger, hatred, e’en to the shadow of desire—when even you have failed.”

The devotional books Light on the Path, (“Kill out ambition…”), and The Voice of the Silence,  (“let the Disciple slay the Slayer”), are metaphors for self-control as we pursue a spiritual path.

Similarly, the setting of the Bhagavad-Gita is on the plain of a great battlefield called “Kurukshetra.” This plain is considered sacred, and is symbolic, W. Q. Judge says in his essay, “of the body which is acquired by karma.”

This metaphorical “killing” or “slaying,” is not contrary to the Buddhist and Hindu doctrine of “Ahimsa” (harmlessness). It refers rather to inner control over our physical senses, ambition, intellect, etc.—and to resolving our personal karmic challenges, including non-violence and non-separateness.

Continue reading

Visions or Illusions

THE Sanskrit word “Dharana” is defined as “the intense and perfect concentration of the mind upon some one interior object.”

This intense focus should “be accompanied by complete abstraction from everything pertaining to the external Universe, or the world of the senses.”

Further, The Voice of the Silence instructs its students: “from the stronghold of your Soul, chase all your foes away—ambition, anger, hatred, e’en to the shadow of desire—when even you have failed.”

Whenever the Voice of the Silence, or the Bhagavad-Gita, refer to “killing” or “slaying,” this is to be understood a primarily metaphors for control over our physical senses and intellect—and resolving past karma.

Dharana, or focused meditation, is all about slowing the ‘mental noise,’ or what is called the ‘monkey mind,’ and to regain our lost rulership.

ς

Continue reading

Neti Neti

THE idea that things can cease to exist and still be, is a fundamental one in Eastern psychology.

Under this apparent contradiction in terms, there rests a fact of Nature to realize is the important thing.

A familiar instance of a similar paradox is afforded by chemical combination. The question whether Hydrogen and Oxygen cease to exist, when they combine to form water, is still a moot one.

Some [argue] that since they are found again when the water is decomposed, they must be there all the while—others contending that as they actually turn into something totally different, they must cease to exist as themselves for the time being.

“Neither side is able to form the faintest conception of the real condition of a thing, which has become something else, and yet has not ceased to be itself.”

Continue reading

Eye of Light

Helen Keller, Age 7

Helen Keller, Age 7

“Death is no more than passing from one room into another. But there’s a difference for me, you know. Because in that other room I shall be able to see.”- Helen Keller

Many people are suffering today as the world’s financial crisis worsens, property values decline, jobs are lost. We’ve been there before — contraction, recession, depression, expansion— a sure sign of the ruling law of cycles at work.

The Founders took pains to include the “All Seeing Eye” on our dollar bills, but ironically, we prefer to suffer the inevitable consequencesall-seeing-eye2 of our material shenanigans by ignoring the spiritual flip side.

CYCLES RULE

“This second assertion of the Secret Doctrine is the absolute universality of that law of periodicity,” Blavatsky insists, and “in it we see one of the absolutely fundamental laws of the universe.”

As Krishna tells it in The Bhagavad-Gita, “These two, light and darkness, are the world’s eternal ways.”

Reincarnation is the evolutionary means by which lessons are learned. “It is abundantly clear that one life,” William Q. Judge says in The Necessity for Reincarnation, “even if prolonged, is no more adequate to gain knowledge, acquire experience, solidify principle, and form character, than would one day in infancy be adequate to fit for the duties of mature manhood.”

It is only through this Law of coordinated rebirths, that our spiritual eye can be gradually be awakened permanently.

THE STORY OF JAMES – Part 1

EVOLUTION TRIPLE

There are always three evolutionary forces in play, according to Theosophy — physical, mental and spiritual — “a triple evolutionary scheme,” Blavatsky writes, “which in our system are inextricably interwoven and interblended at every point” (S.D. I, 181).

In this scheme, evolution is much more than a blind physical process. “The cycles must run their rounds,” a Master writes, “Periods of mental and moral light and darkness succeed each other, as day does night.” - A Master’s Letter

LIGHT MATTERS

On our plane of existence, Spirit or light, and Matter or darkness, can never appear separately. They are twins — change one, you change the other. We carry them around every day, on dollar bills in our pockets, without realizing we are carrying around another spiritual light-bringer, the pineal gland in our brain.

drjilltaylor2This is referred to in the Bible: “The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light,” says Matthew 6:22, Luke 11:34.

The pineal gland is a small organ in the brain resembling a pine cone; technically called the epiphysis, forming part of the ventricular or hollow center of the brain, connected with the central canal of the spinal cord.

SPIRITUAL MIND

“[T]he pineal gland, as shown, is far more connected with Soul and Spirit than with the physiological senses of man,” Blavatsky writes, “…for nature never creates the smallest, the most insignificant form without some definite purpose and use.”

It was an active organ, we say, at that stage of evolution when the spiritual element in man reigned supreme over the hardly nascent intellectual and psychic elements. The eye is the mirror and also the window of the soul, says popular wisdom, and Vox populi Vox Dei.

“[T]he pineal gland,” Blavatsky says, “… is the very key to the highest and divinest consciousness in manhis omniscient, spiritual and all embracing mind.” – Dialogue on the Mysteries of the Afterlife

“…there is a power in man which enables him to judge aright—he has the all-seeing eye,” Robert Crosbie writes, in The Kingly Mystery [13] — “the all-encompassing sight which permits him to see the justice of all things.” This power implies a choice, he says – “The questions before each human being are: Whom will ye serve?”

STRETCHING CONSCIOUSNESS

PROGRESSIVE AWAKENINGS

“Progressive awakenings,” are a hallmark of H. P. Blavatsky’s teachings in The Secret Doctrine. “As we rise in the scale of development we perceive that during the stages through which we have passed we mistook shadows for realities,” she writes,

and the upward progress of the Ego is a series of progressive awakenings, each advance bringing with it the idea that now, at last, we have reached “reality;” but only when we shall have reached the absolute Consciousness, and blended our own with it, shall we be free from the delusions produced by Maya [illusion]. (SD I:39-40.)

ATTRACTING ATTENTION

But what practical measures can we take to achieve freedom from delusion? An example of the popular idiom “Be careful what you ask for” is the law of attraction, described first by William Q. Judge, in an article titled simply KARMA:

“By directing the mind and aspirations to the lower plane,” he writes, “a ‘fire’ or centre of attraction, is set up there, and in order to feed and fatten it, the energies of the whole upper plane are drawn down and exhausted in supplying the need of energy which exists below due to the indulgence of sense gratification.”

On the other hand, the centre of attraction may be fixed in the upper portion, and then all the needed energy goes there to result in increase of spirituality. It must be remembered that Nature is all bountiful and withholds not her hand. The demand is made, and the supply will come. But at what cost?

CHILDHOOD REINCARNATION PART 1

Stressing the importance of what we absorb in early childhood, leading to the age of responsibility, Blavatsky writes:

Man has his “double” or shadow, properly so called, around which the physical body of the foetus—the future man—is built. The imagination of the mother, or an accident which affects the child, will affect also the astral body. The astral and the physical both exist before the mind is developed into action, and before the Atma [spirit] awakes. This occurs when the child is seven years old, and with it comes the responsibility attaching to a conscious sentient being. (Raja Yoga or Occultism)

CHILDHOOD REINCARNATION PART 2


This is the “Third Fundamental” of Theosophy, human beings engaging a series of developmental stages. According to this, we acquire our individuality “first by natural impulse,” before the age of seven, “and then by self-induced and self-devised efforts” thereafter.

Each stage the reincarnating soul is “checked by its Karma,” Blavatsky says, and gradually “ascending through all the degrees of intelligence.” This is repeated at each of our new births, and the full acquirement of the highest spiritual mind could take many lifetimes.

The subject of the evolution of human beings cycling on a sevenfold plan, over millions of years, is vast. The journey is mirrored by like changes in the Earth itself, and will be continued in our next post.