Tag Archives: Logos

10 Questions for the Dalai Lama

torch-of-truthYOU must not think that the gods are without employment, Synesius the Greek bishop of Ptolemais once declared.

The idea is developed by Theosophical Co-Founder W. Q. Judge in his article “Cycles,” concerning the duty of the ancient gods to watch over humanity.

Synesius: “For this providence is divine and most ample, which frequently through one man pays attention to and affects countless multitudes of men.”

“For they descend according to orderly periods of time:

“… for the purpose of imparting a beneficent impulse in the republics of mankind.”

μ

Describing these descending Gods, Synesius of Cyrene, a Neoplatonist Bishop continues: “For there is indeed in the terrestrial abode the sacred tribe of heroes who pay attention to mankind, and who are able to give them assistance even in the smallest concerns.”

Olympia Flame

“This heroic tribe is, as it were,” as quoted in the article, “a colony from the gods established here in order that this terrine abode may not be left destitute of a better nature.”

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Saving the World

SYOU must not think that the gods are without employment, declared Synesius, the Greek bishop of Ptolemais.

The idea is developed by theosophist W. Q. Judge in his article “Cycles,” about the duty of the ancient gods to watch over humanity.

“For this providence is divine and most ample, which frequently through one man pays attention to and affects countless multitudes of men.”

“For they descend according to orderly periods of time,” Synesius wrote,

“… for the purpose of imparting a beneficent impulse in the republics of mankind.”

μ

Describing these descending Gods, Synesius of Cyrene, a Neoplatonist as well as a bishop says: “For there is indeed in the terrestrial abode the sacred tribe of heroes who pay attention to mankind, and who are able to give them assistance even in the smallest concerns.”

“This heroic tribe is, as it were,” Judge quotes in his article, “a colony from the gods established here

“…in order that this terrine abode may not be left destitute of a better nature.”

ξ

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The Evening Star

“NO STAR among the countless myriads that twinkle over the sidereal fields of the night sky,” writes Helena Blavatsky, “shines so dazzlingly as the planet Venus.”

“Venus is the queen among our planets, the crown jewel of our solar system.”

“She is the inspirer of the poet, the guardian and companion of the lonely shepherd,” she writes, “the lovely morning and the evening star.”

“For, ‘Stars teach as well as shine,’ although their secrets are still untold and unrevealed to the majority of men, including astronomers.”

“They are ‘a beauty and a mystery,’ verily.”

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“This story shall now be told,” she says, “for the benefit of those who may have neglected their astral mythology.”

“Venus, characterised by Pythagoras as the sol alter, a second Sun, on account of her magnificent radiance – equalled by none other was the first to draw the attention of ancient Theogonists.”

“Before it began to be called Venus, it was known in pre-Hesiodic theogony as Eosphoros (or Phosphoros), and Hesperos, the children of the dawn and twilight.”

ς

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The Watchers

YOU must not think that the gods are without employment, declared Synesius, the Greek bishop of Ptolemais.

The idea is developed by theosophist W. Q. Judge in his article “Cycles,” about the duty of the ancient gods to watch over humanity.

“For this providence is divine and most ample, which frequently through one man pays attention to and affects countless multitudes of men.”

“For they descend according to orderly periods of time,” he wrote,

“… for the purpose of imparting a beneficent impulse in the republics of mankind.”

μ

In describing these descending Gods, Synesius explained: “For there is indeed in the terrestrial abode the sacred tribe of heroes who pay attention to mankind, and who are able to give them assistance even in the smallest concerns.”

“This heroic tribe is, as it were,” Judge quotes, “a colony from the gods established here

“…in order that this terrene abode may not be left destitute of a better nature.”

ξ

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Descent of the Gods

YOU must not think that the gods are without employment, declared Synesius, the Greek bishop of Ptolemais.

The idea is developed by theosophist W. Q. Judge in his article “Cycles,” about the duty of the ancient gods to watch over humanity:

“For they descend according to orderly periods of time,” Synesius wrote,

“… for the purpose of imparting a beneficent impulse in the republics of mankind.”

“For this providence is divine and most ample, which frequently through one man pays attention to and affects countless multitudes of men.”

Synesius, describing these Gods, continues: “For there is indeed in the terrestrial abode the sacred tribe of heroes who pay attention to mankind, and who are able to give them assistance even in the smallest concerns. . . .

“This heroic tribe is, as it were, a colony from the gods established here in order that this terrene abode may not be left destitute of a better nature.”

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When Darkness Falls

“NO STAR among the countless myriads that twinkle over the sidereal fields of the night sky,” writes Helena Blavatsky, “shines so dazzlingly as the planet Venus.”

“Venus is the queen among our planets, the crown jewel of our solar system.”

“She is the inspirer of the poet, the guardian and companion of the lonely shepherd,” she writes, “the lovely morning and the evening star.”

“For, ‘Stars teach as well as shine,’ although their secrets are still untold and unrevealed to the majority of men, including astronomers.”

“They are ‘a beauty and a mystery,’ verily.”

δ

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New Spiritual Patterns 2

DURING critical awakening moments in our spiritual development, we sometimes receive timely messages in our personal consciousness.

More often than not they arrive in symbolic form, and in dreams or visions, challenging our brain dominated mind.

This is because, Theosophy says, our inner, reincarnating self is not here alone. It was chosen by the Higher Self to be its “terrestrial abode.”

In the crop formation above, discovered in Northdowns, Wiltshire, UK on August 13, 2010, we can clearly imagine the rays from the Spiritual Sun interacting with the mortal human beings below.

This occult process is described by The Secret Doctrine in metaphysical terms, how our inner child

“is drawn into the one and highest beam of the Parent-Sun.”

It is this spiritual evolution of the inner, immortal — now semi-awakened aspect of our nature, the teaching says — which is the “fundamental tenet in the Occult Sciences.”

The closer our personal self gets to our Higher Self, true occultism says, the more harmonious outcome in life for a human selves.

A direct effect of an increased harmony between the Arjuna and Krishna in us, that altruism eventually becomes the ruling factor in our life. This altruism or unselfishness is an “integral part of self-development,” as described in a previous post, when acceptance is willing and unforced. Continue reading

A New Order of Ages 2

THE gods are not without employment, wrote the Greek bishop Synesius of Cyrene (c. 373 – c. 414) – but their “descent to this earth” is not continuous.

They descend according to orderly periods of time, he said, “for the purpose of imparting a beneficent impulse in the republics of mankind.”

“For this providence is divine and most ample,” quotes W. Q. Judge in Cycles —”which frequently one man pays attention to, and affects countless multitudes of men.”

Describing the Gods, Synesius writes: “For there is indeed in the terrestrial abode the sacred tribe of heroes who pay attention to mankind, and who are able to give them assistance even in the smallest concerns:-

“This heroic tribe is, as it were, a colony from the gods established here, in order that this terrene abode may not be left destitute of a better nature.”

The Mahatmas

mahatma gandhi - Sharang and Prash 2007

These “gods” are also known in India as Mahatmas. No better description of these sages can be pointed to than  W. Q. Judge explaining the Sanskrit terms in his article The Mahatmas as Ideals and Facts:

“The whole sweep, meaning, and possibility of evolution are contained in the word Mahatma,” Judge writes. “Maha is ‘great,’ Atma is ‘soul’ — and both compounded into one, mean those great souls who have triumphed before us:

“Not because they are made of different stuff and are of some strange family, but just because they are of the human race.”

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