Legacy of Luna


THE famous meditation of John Donne, “never send to know for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee,” highlights two Theosophical principles:

First, the affirmation that there is no isolation, that nature and all mankind are interconnected — and second, karmic responsibility.

“It’s one thing to fashion a particular work of art, sculpture, painting, a worthy accomplishment,” Thoreau once wrote, “but much greater is the creation of one’s life.”

“…to exemplify the highest potential imagined, it is the highest of loving artistic accomplishments,” he believed.

A compassionate activist, Julia Butterfly Hill is a living example of Theosophy pure and simple, took the decisive action taught in The Voice of the Silence — sacrificing  her comfort and well-being to “help Nature and work on with her.”

It must have been a profound inner sense of the sacred that roused Julia, as she climbed up those ropes, to begin a permanent encampment in the endangered redwood trees.

“She doesn’t follow any organized religion but says she believes very strongly in the spirituality of the universe.”

Please note this post was
updated and republished at:

Legacy of Love

 

 

2 responses to “Legacy of Luna

  1. Some Great Insights here, thank you 😀
    thought you might like my machinima film the butterfly’s tale~

    Bright Blessings
    elf ~

  2. It really gets to me. I’m myself a Biologist so I really understand her. I heard about her a while ago, the girl who lived in a tree, isn’t she?

    Sounds neat…

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