Monthly Archives: September 2011

Life Electric

WE are surrounded today by untold numbers and varieties of energy-intensive, man-made machines and gadgets.

We are besieged by these machines all day, they rule our lives in the developed world.

These products range from the hardly necessary to the  indispensable. From TV’s and video games, to cardiac pacemakers, to our beloved cell phones and computers.

The electromagnetic frequencies (EMFs) that spin off from these products, it turns out, are our developed society’s price-to-pay for its monster creation—an all pervasive, insidious, ever-throbbing, artificial world.

Many readers will recall Rachel Carson’s comfort-shattering Exposé, Silent Spring, which documented the world-wide destructive effects of pesticide use, notably DDT.

Her research launched what has now become our well-regulated and accepted organic food industry.


Back to the throbbing, man-made EMF swimming pool: the use of wireless cell towers, radar towers, and hundreds of Earth-circling satellites, is again exacting, as pesticides did, and still do, a huge price from nature. We may not be able to recover from the effects of this interference.

Clearly, we are flawed space travelers ignorantly abusing an natural system that is no less than Life itself.


The original pristine natural state of the world and the cosmos, is both electro-magnetic and spiritual — we co-exist with our fellow planetary travelers at every level, from cells to stars. So any crippling abuse of this system is of critical concern.

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Souls of Nature

ANYONE who thinks Theosophy is only about abstract metaphysics, invisible worlds or mystical hierarchies, might want to think again.

The old theosophical teachings, referred to as the “Wisdom Religion,” counsels active altruism, and are serious about protecting Mother Earth with all her creatures great and small.

“Help Nature,” says Blavatsky in her translation of The Book of the Golden Precepts, “and work on with her.”

“Real Theosophy is Altruism, Mme. Blavatsky also wrote in her heroic article Our Cycle and the Next, adding: “and we cannot repeat it too often:

it is brotherly love, mutual help, unswerving devotion to Truth.”

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The Watchers

YOU must not think that the gods are without employment, declared Synesius, the Greek bishop of Ptolemais.

The idea is developed by theosophist W. Q. Judge in his article “Cycles,” about the duty of the ancient gods to watch over humanity.

“For this providence is divine and most ample, which frequently through one man pays attention to and affects countless multitudes of men.”

“For they descend according to orderly periods of time,” he wrote,

“… for the purpose of imparting a beneficent impulse in the republics of mankind.”


In describing these descending Gods, Synesius explained: “For there is indeed in the terrestrial abode the sacred tribe of heroes who pay attention to mankind, and who are able to give them assistance even in the smallest concerns.”

“This heroic tribe is, as it were,” Judge quotes, “a colony from the gods established here

“…in order that this terrene abode may not be left destitute of a better nature.”


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Legacy of Love

THE famous meditation of John Donne, “never send to know for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee,” highlights two Theosophical principles:

First, the affirmation that there is no isolation, that nature and all mankind are interconnected — and second, karmic responsibility.

“It’s one thing to fashion a particular work of art, sculpture, painting, a worthy accomplishment,” Thoreau once wrote, “but much greater is the creation of one’s life.”

“…to exemplify the highest potential imagined, it is the highest of loving artistic accomplishments,” he believed.

A compassionate activist, Julia Butterfly Hill is a living example of Theosophy pure and simple, took the decisive action taught in The Voice of the Silence — sacrificing  her comfort and well-being to “help Nature and work on with her.”

It must have been a profound inner sense of the sacred that roused Julia, as she climbed up those ropes, to begin a permanent encampment in the endangered redwood trees.

“She doesn’t follow any organized religion but says she believes very strongly in the spirituality of the universe.”

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