Monthly Archives: June 2013

The Big Bang is Wrong

HUMANITY is divided into thousands of  languages, hundreds of sects and cults, castes, creeds, religious sects and political ideologies.

Instead of being demonstrators of love and service, many groups encourage differences, foster criticism, opposition and attacks on others.

How, then, can we ever hope to achieve harmony and oneness, and become a new humanity that selflessly eschews all differences and personal enmities?

A world united as One Being has been the hope of mankind for ages. Poets, artists, philosophers and statespersons have dreamed of it. Self-interested politicians claim they have the grand solution to the problems of disease, hunger, poverty, homelessness.

But they have not succeeded, because they are motivated by personal agendas, and a failure to accept and value the spiritual oneness of humanity.

ξ

In our obsession with the bitter roots of sectarian differences and selfish, materialist agendas, we remain blind to the reality of life as One Being. “Real Theosophy IS ALTRUISM,” Mme. Blavatsky once said — “and we cannot repeat it too often:

“It is brotherly love, mutual help, unswerving devotion to Truth.”

Continue reading

Hands of Healing

Morea_Garcia

Morea Garcia

PARISIANS including Marie Antoinette, the wife of King Louis XVI, were in love with a man by the name of Franz Friedrich Anton Mesmer.

The Paris press reported the phenomenon as “Mesmeromania.”

The gregarious Dr. Mesmer was wealthy because he married a rich widow, but also because he became a successful Viennese physician.

He lived on a well-appointed estate, and often hosted a twelve-year-old musical prodigy named Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Mozart was introduced to Benjamin Franklin’s invention, the “Armonica,” by Mesmer, (who used it to ‘mesmerize’ his patients.)

The young Mozart composed a musical piece for Mesmer’s “Glass Armonica,” and later wrote a solo Armonica piece, and a larger quintet for Armonica, flute, oboe, viola and cello.

Mesmer was the darling of Parisian Elite Society in the 1780’s, a confidant of the super rich and super powerful.

Ω

All over Paris, people were throwing themselves under trees Mesmer had ‘mesmerized.’ They would flail, convulse, scream and claim healing. Mesmer said he had a healing power in his hands he called “Animal Magnetism.”

Continue reading

Meeting an Angel

THE  surreal landscape of Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass has Alice wondering what the world is like on the other side of a mirror.

To her surprise, Alice is able to pass into a fantastic astral world and experience an alternate existence.

A puzzled Alice discovers a book with looking-glass poetry called “Jabberwocky,” which she can read only by holding it up to a mirror.

To Theosophical students, Carroll’s imaginative invention is an unambiguous reminder of “the astral light” of occultism, a universal storage drive where original images of all things are seen in reverse of their visible projections on our terrestrial plane.

In 1871, mediumship and table-tipping were all the rage, detailed in Mitch Horowitz’s recent book Occult America. Understandably, Carroll’s sequel to Alice in Wonderland was wildly popular at the time.

Clairvoyance and psychic powers have always fascinated the public. But then, as now, they were considered nonsensical by mainstream scientists.

œ

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast,” the White Queen confides to Alice.

Once of interest only to ghost-hunters, and the derided science of parapsychology, “The Big 5”: Precognition, Telepathy, Clairvoyance, Psychokinesis and Healing (known collectively as “psi”), are now being noticed by the rank-and-file psychological and neuroscience community.

Continue reading

You Raise Me Up

ASTRONAUT Edgar Mitchell’s epiphany struck when he looked out the window of his spacecraft at the Earth, Moon and Sun, surrounded by an infinitely vast universe.

Suddenly it came to him that the molecules and cells of our bodies must have had their origin in those faraway stars.

It was at that moment an overwhelming realization of the interconnectedness of all life dawned on him. It was a life-altering flash of insight — not an “intellectual knowledge,” he says, but in a “visceral knowing.”

“It was accompanied by a very blissful feeling that I had never experienced before.”

Dr. Mitchell describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness, in this excerpt from Renée Scheltema’s visionary film, Something Unknown is Doing We Don’t Know What.

Having had such a life-changing experience, sometimes called the Overview Effect, the former astronaut, along with parapsychologist Charles Tart, attempt to interpret the non-linear feelings and insights for the rest of us.

Continue reading

My Three Brains

Hamlet

Hamlet

CONSCIOUSNESS itself is thought by most neuroscientists to be created by and located entirely in the physical brain tucked away inside our skulls.

This persistent worldview is only reinforced by our body language: we always describe thinking by pointing to our heads.

But native cultures never engaged in such ignorant skullduggery. The traditional Native American view always considered the heart to be the center of thought and motive.

Confusing matters more are those familiar ‘gut-feelings’ we often have. These  compelling instincts, studies show, are more often than not signal accurate intuitions, even foretelling of some future event.

“Two brains may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but they make literal and evolutionary sense,” says NY Times writer Harriet Brown. But three brains? That does seem a stretch. Yet in Theosophy every cell has a consciousness of its own, even every atom.

[Like the heart], “the enteric nervous system [the gut] must assess conditions, decide on a course of action and initiate a reflex.  And does all this on its own, with little help from the central nervous system.”

Undeterred, most neuroscientists continue to diligently catalog what they insist are ‘the neural correlates of consciousness’ in the brain, and seem determined to prove that neurons are the sole authors of our thoughts and feelings, isolated exclusively in the fatty workshop between our ears.

In this consensus view when we die everything disappears forever — including our soul and that individual ‘I am I’ consciousness. But this reductionist view of mind and consciousness is losing favor with many research scientists on the leading edge today, and is about to radically change.

Continue reading

The Power of Compassion

GoddessEQUAL justice to all and love to every creature is not the highest standard in Theosophy, co-founder H. P. Blavatsky maintained.

The Author of the Key to Theosophy said she held to a “far higher” standard.

Mme Blavatsky described that standard as “the giving to others more than to oneself , i.e. self-sacrifice.”

She also noted: “such was the standard and abounding measure which marked so preeminently the greatest Teachers and Masters of Humanity — e. g., Gautama Buddha in History, and Jesus of Nazareth as in the Gospels.”

“This trait alone was enough to secure to them the perpetual reverence and gratitude of the generations of men that came after them,” she insisted, noting “there are many instances to illustrate it in history.”

“Self-sacrifice for practical good to save many, or several people, Theosophy holds, is far higher than self-abnegation for a sectarian idea, such as that of ‘saving the heathen from damnation,’ for instance.”

Continue reading

The One Self-existing Reality

WE live on a planet constantly in motion, and except for the occasional natural catastrophe, it is usually a very slow, orderly motion.

The Earth is billions of years old and still in the making—glacial cycles come and go, continents move, mountains form and crumble. Yet Life persists.

Modern Science has, for decades, tried to sell us every soulless theory they could, from the ‘big bang,’ to the chemical origin of life, and a gravity-driven universe.

Our current dogmatic science ought to fear approaching the problem of life’s origins. Their hypothetical models always postulate random events, and chance mutations, in a hostile universe — a cosmos without conscience, consciousness or spiritual life.

All new theories lead up blind alleys. How Earth formed, how life arose. All we are offered is endless speculation, and the stunningly unscientific approach that, instead of welcoming new ideas, refuses to follow where the evidence leads.

And what life is in its most essential essence, continues to be the most ignored problem in science.

The mainstream theorists have so far been content with a soulless stew of blind matter, which has neither intelligent design or purpose. But these have led nowhere in explaining the many mysteries hidden in everyday life.

In stark contrast, Theosophy teaches that ‘life’ did not have to be created, but is a universal principle, and underlies the universe both macro and micro. Life only ‘arises’ to our attention according to science under rigid conditions.

“Life must conform to a chance based material worldview, measurable by laboratory instruments, and judged by our human physical senses.”

§

But life is really a dynamic interaction between the forces of spirit, mind and matter, Theosophy says, and develops its forms via patterns embedded in an indwelling, divine evolutionary plan.  A great mystery recently was discovered challenging the foundations of modern scientific principles.

Continue reading