Tag Archives: Celtic Woman

Our Queen Sister, the Morning and Evening Star

Hayley Westenra

“NO STAR among the countless myriads that twinkle over the sidereal fields of the night sky,” wrote Helena Blavatsky, “shines so dazzlingly as the planet Venus.”

“Venus is the queen among our planets, the crown jewel of our solar system.”

“She is the inspirer of the poet, the guardian and companion of the lonely shepherd,” she wrote, “the lovely morning and the evening star.”

“For, ‘Stars teach as well as shine,’ although their secrets are still untold and unrevealed to the majority of men, including astronomers.”

They are ‘a beauty
and a mystery,’ verily.

“This story shall now be told, for the benefit of those who may have neglected their astral mythology. Venus, characterized by Pythagoras as the sol alter, a second Sun, on account of her magnificent radiance – equaled by none other – was the first to draw the attention of ancient Theogonists.” 

Bright Stars

“Venus, characterized by Pythagoras as the sol alter, a second Sun, on account of her magnificent radiance – equaled by none other was the first to draw the attention of ancient Theogonists.

Before it began to be called Venus, it was known in pre-Hesiodic theogony as Eosphoros (or Phosphoros), and Hesperos, the children of the dawn and twilight.

ς

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Beyond the Personal: Something Unknown

ASTRONAUT Edgar Mitchell’s epiphany struck when he looked out the window of his spacecraft at the Earth, Moon and Sun, surrounded by an infinitely vast universe.

Suddenly it came to him that the molecules and cells of our bodies must have had their origin in those faraway stars.

It was at that moment an overwhelming realization of the interconnectedness of all life dawned on him. It was a life-altering flash of insight — not an “intellectual knowledge,” he says, but in a “visceral knowing.”

“It was accompanied by a very blissful feeling that I had never experienced before.”

Dr. Mitchell describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness, in this excerpt from Renée Scheltema’s visionary film, Something Unknown is Doing We Don’t Know What.

Having had such a life-changing experience, sometimes called the Overview Effect, the former astronaut, along with parapsychologist Charles Tart, attempt to interpret the non-linear feelings and insights for the rest of us.

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You Raise Me Up

ASTRONAUT Edgar Mitchell’s epiphany struck when he looked out the window of his spacecraft at the Earth, Moon and Sun, surrounded by an infinitely vast universe.

Suddenly it came to him that the molecules and cells of our bodies must have had their origin in those faraway stars.

It was at that moment an overwhelming realization of the interconnectedness of all life dawned on him. It was a life-altering flash of insight — not an “intellectual knowledge,” he says, but in a “visceral knowing.”

“It was accompanied by a very blissful feeling that I had never experienced before.”

Dr. Mitchell describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness, in this excerpt from Renée Scheltema’s visionary film, Something Unknown is Doing We Don’t Know What.

Having had such a life-changing experience, sometimes called the Overview Effect, the former astronaut, along with parapsychologist Charles Tart, attempt to interpret the non-linear feelings and insights for the rest of us.

Continue reading

The Evening Star

“NO STAR among the countless myriads that twinkle over the sidereal fields of the night sky,” writes Helena Blavatsky, “shines so dazzlingly as the planet Venus.”

“Venus is the queen among our planets, the crown jewel of our solar system.”

“She is the inspirer of the poet, the guardian and companion of the lonely shepherd,” she writes, “the lovely morning and the evening star.”

“For, ‘Stars teach as well as shine,’ although their secrets are still untold and unrevealed to the majority of men, including astronomers.”

“They are ‘a beauty and a mystery,’ verily.”

δ

“This story shall now be told,” she says, “for the benefit of those who may have neglected their astral mythology.”

“Venus, characterised by Pythagoras as the sol alter, a second Sun, on account of her magnificent radiance – equalled by none other was the first to draw the attention of ancient Theogonists.”

“Before it began to be called Venus, it was known in pre-Hesiodic theogony as Eosphoros (or Phosphoros), and Hesperos, the children of the dawn and twilight.”

ς

Continue reading

Sacred Dawn

TODAY is the summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, which means it’s the longest day of the year in 2011.

The exact moment of the solstice today will occur at 1:16 p.m. ET. In the Southern Hemisphere, today actually marks the 2011 winter solstice.

As with mythology, such traditions appeal to our imagination and are open to different interpretations.

“Although revolution and change often appear to be precipitated by things that happen to us from without,” theosophical astroblogger Lauren Coleman assures us:

“this process of revolution is also dependent on an inner evolution, an unfolding from within.”

Ω

“Heralding the beginning of summer and the longest day of the year,” writes astrologer Elaine Kalantarian, “the June solstice was called Midsummer by the Celts.”

Many people believe that the summer crop circles in Wiltshire UK carry a symbolically encoded message. (Click here, or on the photo below to view the latest circles.)

©

Symbology experts such as researcher Freddy Silva, imagine that the enigmatic designs in growing fields are sacred geometry, and may represent ‘mandalas of hope’ for our troubled world. 

Theosophical scholar, David Pratt, thinks so. In his engaging article “Crop Circles and their Message,” he theorizes: “The basic element of crop glyphs is the circle which can symbolize unity, boundless space, and the universal creative spirit or godforce.”

“Crop circles with rings and satellite circles sometimes resemble diagrams of the chemical elements, with their orbiting electrons.”

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The Overview Effect

THE epiphany for astronaut Edgar Mitchell occurred when he looked out the window of his spacecraft at the Earth, Moon and Sun, and at the infinitely vast star systems.

Suddenly it came to him that the molecules and cells of our bodies must have had their origin in those faraway stars.

It was at that moment an overwhelming realization of the interconnectedness of all life dawned on him. It was a life-altering flash of intuition resulting not in “intellectual knowledge,” he says, but in a “visceral knowing.”

“It was accompanied by a very blissful feeling that I had never experienced before.”

Dr. Mitchell describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness, in this excerpt from Renée Scheltema’s visionary film, Something Unknown is Doing We Don’t Know What.

Having had such a life-changing experience, sometimes called the Overview Effect, the former astronaut, along with parapsychologist Charles Tart, attempt to interpret the non-linear feelings and insights for the rest of us.

Continue reading