Tag Archives: Charles Tart

Future Science: Discovering the Soul of Things

Jelena Momcilov

Jelena Momcilov “Magnet Girl”

MANY scientists like to think that science already understands the ways of the natural world.

For them the fundamental questions are answered, leaving only the details to be filled in.

The numerous impressive achievements of modern science seem to support this confident attitude.

But in recent research, including his own studies, frontier biologist Rupert Sheldrake believes otherwise.

His experiments reveal jaw dropping problems at the heart of physics, cosmology, biology, medicine and psychology. Similar to H. P. Blavatsky’s complaints about 19th century modern science.  Not much has changed since then, it would appear. Science still refuses to acknowledge “the soul of things.”

See: Connecting the Worlds of Science and Spirituality

Resolutely dismissive of paranormal findings or brain-free consciousness, traditional science asserts that matter is the gold standard. But even great authorities especially in modern science may be found to err, and scientific dicta are frequently influenced more by personal prejudice than rigorous research.

A pure impartial science always weighs “the laboriously acquired knowledge of the senses with the intuitive omniscience of the Spiritual divine Soul,” said H. P. Blavatsky, world Theosophy teacher.

Perspectives

As Hermes believed so does Theosophy, she wrote in The Secret Doctrine 1:296 that “knowledge differs from sense which is only of the physical world — but Knowledge is the end of sense which is only the illusion of our physical brain and its intellect.”

It is “self-contradictory, and simply absurd — from a scientific point of view, as much and even more than from the occult aspect of the esoteric knowledge.”

When the high priests of material science, she wrote, “resolve consciousness into a secretion from the grey matter of the brain, and everything else in nature into a mode of motion, we protest against the doctrine as being un-philosophical.” [And unscientific]

In a formal, conclusive and hilarious experiment he calls “Telephone Telepathy,” Rupert Sheldrake demonstrates that consciousness can indeed fly away on its own from one mind into another!

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Beyond the Personal: Something Unknown

ASTRONAUT Edgar Mitchell’s epiphany struck when he looked out the window of his spacecraft at the Earth, Moon and Sun, surrounded by an infinitely vast universe.

Suddenly it came to him that the molecules and cells of our bodies must have had their origin in those faraway stars.

It was at that moment an overwhelming realization of the interconnectedness of all life dawned on him. It was a life-altering flash of insight — not an “intellectual knowledge,” he says, but in a “visceral knowing.”

“It was accompanied by a very blissful feeling that I had never experienced before.”

Dr. Mitchell describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness, in this excerpt from Renée Scheltema’s visionary film, Something Unknown is Doing We Don’t Know What.

Having had such a life-changing experience, sometimes called the Overview Effect, the former astronaut, along with parapsychologist Charles Tart, attempt to interpret the non-linear feelings and insights for the rest of us.

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The Delusions of Science

Jelena Momcilov

Jelena Momcilov “Magnet Girl”

MANY scientists like to think that science already understands the ways of the natural world.

The fundamental questions are answered, leaving only the details to be filled in.

The impressive achievements of science seem to support this confident attitude. But in recent research including his own studies, frontier biologist Rupert Sheldrake believes otherwise.

His experiments reveal unexpected problems at the heart of physics, cosmology, biology, medicine and psychology.

Resolutely dismissive of paranormal findings or brain-free consciousness, traditional science asserts that matter is the gold standard. But even great authorities especially in modern science may be found to err, and scientific dicta are frequently influenced more by personal prejudice than rigorous research.

A pure impartial science always weighs “the laboriously acquired knowledge of the senses with the intuitive omniscience of the Spiritual divine Soul,” said H. P. Blavatsky, world Theosophy teacher.

Perspectives

As Hermes believed so does Theosophy, she wrote (Secret Doctrine 1:296): that “knowledge differs from sense which is only of the physical world — but Knowledge is the end of sense which is only the illusion of our physical brain and its intellect.”

It is “self-contradictory, and simply absurd — from a scientific point of view, as much and even more than from the occult aspect of the esoteric knowledge.”

When the high priests of material science, she wrote, “resolve consciousness into a secretion from the grey matter of the brain, and everything else in nature into a mode of motion, we protest against the doctrine as being un-philosophical.”

In a formal yet hilarious experiment he calls “Telephone Telepathy,” Rupert Sheldrake demonstrates that consciousness can indeed fly away on its own from one mind to another.

Continue reading

You Raise Me Up

ASTRONAUT Edgar Mitchell’s epiphany struck when he looked out the window of his spacecraft at the Earth, Moon and Sun, surrounded by an infinitely vast universe.

Suddenly it came to him that the molecules and cells of our bodies must have had their origin in those faraway stars.

It was at that moment an overwhelming realization of the interconnectedness of all life dawned on him. It was a life-altering flash of insight — not an “intellectual knowledge,” he says, but in a “visceral knowing.”

“It was accompanied by a very blissful feeling that I had never experienced before.”

Dr. Mitchell describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness, in this excerpt from Renée Scheltema’s visionary film, Something Unknown is Doing We Don’t Know What.

Having had such a life-changing experience, sometimes called the Overview Effect, the former astronaut, along with parapsychologist Charles Tart, attempt to interpret the non-linear feelings and insights for the rest of us.

Continue reading

Science Set Free: The Tipping Point

Jelena Momcilov

Jelena Momcilov “Magnet Girl”

MANY scientists like to think that science already understands the ways of the natural world.

The fundamental questions are answered, leaving only the details to be filled in.

The impressive achievements of science seem to support this confident attitude. But in recent research including his own studies, frontier biologist Rupert Sheldrake believes otherwise.

His experiments reveal unexpected problems at the heart of physics, cosmology, biology, medicine and psychology.

Resolutely dismissive of paranormal findings or brain-free consciousness, traditional science asserts that matter is the gold standard. But even great authorities especially in modern science may be found to err, and scientific dicta are frequently influenced more by personal prejudice than rigorous research.

A pure impartial science always weighs “the laboriously acquired knowledge of the senses with the intuitive omniscience of the Spiritual divine Soul,” said H. P. Blavatsky, world Theosophy teacher.

Perspectives

As Hermes believed so does Theosophy, she wrote (Secret Doctrine 1:296): that “knowledge differs from sense which is only of the physical world — but Knowledge is the end of sense which is only the illusion of our physical brain and its intellect.”

It is “self-contradictory, and simply absurd — from a scientific point of view, as much and even more than from the occult aspect of the esoteric knowledge.”

When the high priests of material science, she wrote, “resolve consciousness into a secretion from the grey matter of the brain, and everything else in nature into a mode of motion, we protest against the doctrine as being un-philosophical.”

In a formal yet hilarious experiment he calls “Telephone Telepathy,” Rupert Sheldrake demonstrates that consciousness can indeed fly away on its own from one mind to another.

Continue reading

Healing Naturally

MAINSTREAM scientists looking for the source of consciousness, insist its origin must be located in the physical brain.

They are certain that all cognition arises from the activity of neurons attached to specific structures, which have fixed locations.

Yet many credible scientific researchers today are unconvinced, and dispute these assumptions.

Such open minded investigators are willing to pursue truth wherever it leads, even to evidence that consciousness is a independent entity from the physical structures through which it manifests.

Most so-called New Age science is still considered hocus pocus, and the researcher’s findings are not considered credible, no matter how rigorously the studies are done.

“We live in an age of prejudice, dissimulation and paradox,” Blavatsky wrote in A Paradoxical World, “wherein, like dry leaves caught in a whirlpool, we are tossed helpless, hither and thither, ever struggling between our honest convictions and fear of that cruelest of tyrants—PUBLIC OPINION.”

Poised fearlessly at frontier research are scientific organizations such as the respected Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS) in Petaluma, California, and the Institute of HeartMath in Boulder Creek.

These researchers, and others, like NES energy medicine, are willing to take a leap in pursuit of the fast-moving “soul of things.”

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Hidden Powers of Animals

THIS was such a popular post, we decided to republish it. Many people think that animals are just instinctual machines, but the assumption is false, and many controlled studies prove it.

Investigators discover that humans are not the only beings with self-aware minds, free will, and paranormal powers. There are powerful spiritual and intellectual forces hidden in animals.

Chimps, as will be shown, were found to be smarter than humans in computerized memory tests. But, in the 17th Century, René Descartes, dubbed the “Father of Modern Philosophy,” started everyone off on the wrong paw.

His materialism was not lost on H. P. Blavatsky. “Descartes held the living animal as being simply an automaton,” she noted in the article Have Animals Souls — “a ‘well wound up clock-work,’ according to Malebranche,” and she countered:

“One who adopts the Cartesian theory about the animal, would do as well to accept at once the views of the modern materialists.”

Koko and Tabby

A woman who clearly did not subscribe to the Cartesian theory, found a young lion injured in the forest on the brink of death. She took it home with her and nursed it back to health.

Later she made arrangements with an animal rescue group to take the lion.

Some time passed before the woman had a chance to visit. A video was taken when she walked up to the lion’s cage to see how he was doing. Watch the lion’s reaction when he sees her!

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