Tag Archives: eternity

Our Queen Sister, the Morning and Evening Star

Hayley Westenra

“NO STAR among the countless myriads that twinkle over the sidereal fields of the night sky,” wrote Helena Blavatsky, “shines so dazzlingly as the planet Venus.”

“Venus is the queen among our planets, the crown jewel of our solar system.”

“She is the inspirer of the poet, the guardian and companion of the lonely shepherd,” she wrote, “the lovely morning and the evening star.”

“For, ‘Stars teach as well as shine,’ although their secrets are still untold and unrevealed to the majority of men, including astronomers.”

They are ‘a beauty
and a mystery,’ verily.

“This story shall now be told, for the benefit of those who may have neglected their astral mythology. Venus, characterized by Pythagoras as the sol alter, a second Sun, on account of her magnificent radiance – equaled by none other – was the first to draw the attention of ancient Theogonists.” 

Bright Stars

“Venus, characterized by Pythagoras as the sol alter, a second Sun, on account of her magnificent radiance – equaled by none other was the first to draw the attention of ancient Theogonists.

Before it began to be called Venus, it was known in pre-Hesiodic theogony as Eosphoros (or Phosphoros), and Hesperos, the children of the dawn and twilight.

ς

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The Child-state We Have Lost

olivia-boulerELEVEN years old and “willing to help” was how Olivia Bouler described herself to the Audubon Society when she contacted them about the infamous oil spill tragedy in the Gulf.

The youthful and aspiring ornithologist, artist, and saxophone player wept — like many of us — when she heard about the oil spill in the news.

But uniquely, Olivia was moved to help. Knowing birds were going to suffer, she had to take action.

Inspired by her hero, James Audubon, Olivia wrote to the Audubon Society about her fund-raising idea — using her talent as an artist to give bird drawings to those who donated to wildlife recovery efforts.

To date, she has drawn more than 100 different species of birds, and 400 + original drawings. Olivia was recently featured as an AOL Artist, and the company donated $25,000 to the Audubon Society in her name. 

To appreciate the sacredness of nature doesn’t always take the insights of a naturalist like John Muir. Often it only requires an innocence of heart, usually a child’s — as in Matthew 18:3-4, to “become as little children.”

Unlike adults, young children don’t mince words just to win approval. What they see is what they say.

In her restoration of Theosophy in the world, H. P. Blavatsky was not abstract when it came to standing up for the planet —“help Nature and work on with her” she wrote — and stood up for what she saw as widespread animal abuse and cruelty. (See recent post: Animal Souls)

To become true planetary partners, Blavatsky wrote, we must learn from the Book of the Golden Precepts to “regain the child-state” we have lost.

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The Secret of Life

Positive_Energy_MAINSTREAM science creates an insurmountable obstacle to understanding the real nature of life because of one single belief issue.

Refusing to recognize life as a distinct force, science blocks all understanding of the nature of reality.

“The greatest problem of philosophy, is the physical and substantial nature of life,” H. P. Blavatsky wrote.

“It is its independent nature, which is denied by modern science—because that science is unable to comprehend it.”

“The reincarnationists and believers in Karma alone dimly perceive that the whole secret of Life is in the unbroken series of its manifestations: whether in, or apart from, the physical body.” 

The best definition of life that modern science can seem to come up with is Herbert Spencer’s old definition that defines the phenomenon, but gives no hint of its cause.

“Life is a definite combination of heterogeneous changes,” Spencer says, “both simultaneous and successive

in correspondence with external coexistences and sequences.”

This consensus is sustained because “most researchers still believe they can build from one side of nature, the physical,” says Biocentrist Dr. Robert Lanza who concludes, crucially: “without the other side, the living.”

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Silence of Love

THE famous meditation of John Donne, “never send to know for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee,” highlights two Theosophical principles:

First, the affirmation that there is no isolation, that nature and all mankind are interconnected — and second, karmic responsibility.

“It’s one thing to fashion a particular work of art, sculpture, painting, a worthy accomplishment,” Thoreau once wrote, “but much greater is the creation of one’s life.”

A compassionate activist tree-sitter Julia Butterfly Hill, took action as taught in The Voice of the Silence, and is surely a living example of Theosophy pure and simple. Julia willingly sacrificed her comfort and well-being, as the Voice counsels, to “help Nature and work on with her.”

“…to exemplify the highest potential imagined, it is the highest of loving artistic accomplishments,” Thoreau believed.


“The divine oneness of life, the just and unerring operations of karma, and our cyclic rebirths here on earth,” Ingrid Van Mater writes in Reflections on the Voice of the Silence, “form the broad canvas on which aspects of human conflicts and possibilities are presented.” 

One of the primary keynotes of the Voice, Van Mater notes, is the “illusion stemming from the ‘heresy of separateness,’ and the discipline and exercise of the paramitas or virtues required of a genuine adept or teacher. These include charity, harmony in word and act, patience, fortitude, and indifference to pleasure and pain.”

“She doesn’t follow any organized religion but says she believes very strongly in the spirituality of the universe.”

Redwoods and Rododendrons

It must have been some inner, instinctual sense of harmony that roused Julia, as she climbed up those ropes into Luna, a 20-story Redwood, to begin her precarious encampment as a human shield in the endangered redwood trees. 

“Such is the quality of commitment, the degree of self-sacrifice of a bodhisattva or Buddha of Compassion,” Van Mater wrote, “who gives himself totally to join those, ‘unthanked and unperceived by man,’ who build and sustain the Guardian Wall protecting mankind, to shield us and this planet ‘invisibly from still worse evils.'”

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The Evening Star

“NO STAR among the countless myriads that twinkle over the sidereal fields of the night sky,” writes Helena Blavatsky, “shines so dazzlingly as the planet Venus.”

“Venus is the queen among our planets, the crown jewel of our solar system.”

“She is the inspirer of the poet, the guardian and companion of the lonely shepherd,” she writes, “the lovely morning and the evening star.”

“For, ‘Stars teach as well as shine,’ although their secrets are still untold and unrevealed to the majority of men, including astronomers.”

“They are ‘a beauty and a mystery,’ verily.”

δ

“This story shall now be told,” she says, “for the benefit of those who may have neglected their astral mythology.”

“Venus, characterised by Pythagoras as the sol alter, a second Sun, on account of her magnificent radiance – equalled by none other was the first to draw the attention of ancient Theogonists.”

“Before it began to be called Venus, it was known in pre-Hesiodic theogony as Eosphoros (or Phosphoros), and Hesperos, the children of the dawn and twilight.”

ς

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Legacy of Love

THE famous meditation of John Donne, “never send to know for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee,” highlights two Theosophical principles:

First, the affirmation that there is no isolation, that nature and all mankind are interconnected — and second, karmic responsibility.

“It’s one thing to fashion a particular work of art, sculpture, painting, a worthy accomplishment,” Thoreau once wrote, “but much greater is the creation of one’s life.”

“…to exemplify the highest potential imagined, it is the highest of loving artistic accomplishments,” he believed.

A compassionate activist, Julia Butterfly Hill is a living example of Theosophy pure and simple, took the decisive action taught in The Voice of the Silence — sacrificing  her comfort and well-being to “help Nature and work on with her.”

It must have been a profound inner sense of the sacred that roused Julia, as she climbed up those ropes, to begin a permanent encampment in the endangered redwood trees.

“She doesn’t follow any organized religion but says she believes very strongly in the spirituality of the universe.”

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Flesh of My Flesh

BECAUSE all organisms are related through similarities in DNA sequences, the whole of nature could be really one family.

New insights of epigenetics have lead to a revolutionary view of human biology. Theosophy concurs with many of these new findings.

“The failures of science and its arbitrary assumptions,” Blavatsky says in The Secret Doctrine (2:670), “are far greater on the whole than any ‘extravagant’ esoteric doctrine.”

The traditional geneticist’s view of evolution “is from the animal,” she reminds us, and “mind in its various phases” is viewed, erroneously, as completely separate from matter.

It follows, then, that the identical genes that were in our ancestor’s bodies, that Blavatsky called “The Life Atoms” —”are transmitted through their descendants for generation after generation…

“…so that we are literally ‘flesh of the flesh’ of the primeval creature who has developed into man in the later period.”

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