Tag Archives: gut

Our Three Brains, a Mind of their Own

Microbiology Lab

NEUROSCIENTISTS  have been busy for years attempting to establish and finalize the proposed “neuronal correlates of consciousness” originating in the brain.

Modern science seems determined to prove that consciousness, our thoughts and awareness, must somehow originate in the gray matter between our ears.

This mechanistic view was assumed as fact by the Human Genome Project, established to catalog the complete human DNA and identify specific cures for all diseases, yet has failed to do so.

It is held that genes carry information about how we look, how well our bodies metabolize food or fight infection, and can determine even how we behave.

It was thought, therefore, that researchers would easily be able to identify specific genes underlying specific diseases, and then all diseases could be eliminated by manipulating the related genes.

But it was discovered that the seemingly simple concept was much more complex than expected.

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Just as the origin of consciousness cannot be tagged to specific neurons in the brain, genes are not easily pigeonholed to one disorder. It was found that they function in complex, and frequently changing teams.

Now science is edging nearer to Theosophy, looking closer at a long-neglected area called the microbiome — researching how hundreds of different species of living microbes, inhabiting the human body and outside, are responsible for our health and behaviors. They even discovered a second brain, in our gut, known as the enteric nervous system!

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My Three Brains

Hamlet

Hamlet

CONSCIOUSNESS itself is thought by most neuroscientists to be created by and located entirely in the physical brain tucked away inside our skulls.

This persistent worldview is only reinforced by our body language: we always describe thinking by pointing to our heads.

But native cultures never engaged in such ignorant skullduggery. The traditional Native American view always considered the heart to be the center of thought and motive.

Confusing matters more are those familiar ‘gut-feelings’ we often have. These  compelling instincts, studies show, are more often than not signal accurate intuitions, even foretelling of some future event.

“Two brains may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but they make literal and evolutionary sense,” says NY Times writer Harriet Brown. But three brains? That does seem a stretch. Yet in Theosophy every cell has a consciousness of its own, even every atom.

[Like the heart], “the enteric nervous system [the gut] must assess conditions, decide on a course of action and initiate a reflex.  And does all this on its own, with little help from the central nervous system.”

Undeterred, most neuroscientists continue to diligently catalog what they insist are ‘the neural correlates of consciousness’ in the brain, and seem determined to prove that neurons are the sole authors of our thoughts and feelings, isolated exclusively in the fatty workshop between our ears.

In this consensus view when we die everything disappears forever — including our soul and that individual ‘I am I’ consciousness. But this reductionist view of mind and consciousness is losing favor with many research scientists on the leading edge today, and is about to radically change.

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Miracle Mind

CONSCIOUSNESS is still considered, by most neuroscientists, to be located and created entirely in our physical brain tucked safely inside our skulls.

This persistent worldview is only reinforced by our body language: we always describe thinking by pointing to our heads.

But native cultures never engaged in such ignorant skullduggery. The traditional Native American view always considered the heart to be the center of thought and motive.

Confusing matters more are those familiar ‘gut-feelings’ we often have. These  compelling instincts, studies show, are more often than not signal accurate intuitions, even foretelling of some future event.

Continue reading

Healing from Inside

NEUROSCIENTISTS  have been busy for years trying to catalog the “neuronal correlates of consciousness” in the brain,

They are determined to prove that consciousness somehow originates in the gray matter between our ears.

This mechanistic view was assumed by the Human Genome Project, established to catalog the complete human DNA.

It is held that genes carry information about how we look, how well our bodies metabolize food or fight infection, and can determine even how we behave.

It was thought, therefore, that researchers would easily be able to identify specific genes underlying specific diseases, and then all diseases could be eliminated by manipulating the related genes.

But it was discovered that the seemingly simple concept was much more complex than expected.

Ö

Continue reading