Tag Archives: masters

New Age Mother

Isis-Solar-DiscEVERY year on what is called White Lotus Day, May 8th, theosophists all over the world celebrate the life and work of H. P. Blavatsky.

It is also the anniversary of the passing of Mme. Blavatsky, co-founder of the Theosophical Society with Col. Henry S. Olcott and William Quan Judge.

A world-famous figure of mystery and controversy Blavatsky was a leading intellect behind the occult revival in the West.

More than any other person she was responsible for the introduction of Eastern religious and spiritual thinking to the Western world, and often acknowledged as the mother of the New Age.

Her wildly popular first book was Isis Unveiled: A Master-Key to the Mysteries of Ancient and Modern Science and Theology, published in New York in 1877. It was followed in 1888 by her magnum opus The Secret Doctrine: The Synthesis of Science, Religion, and Philosophy, published in London.

There Mme. Blavatsky produced two other important works The Key to Theosophy, and The Voice of the Silence, indispensable guides to original Theosophy pure and simple.

Isis Unveiled

“The time had now come when it was necessary to speak plainly about the real interpretation of the spiritualistic manifestations,” wrote Charles J. Ryan, an early student of Theosophy.

“H. P. Blavatsky had gained the attention of the public by her brilliant intelligence, the charm of her striking personality, and her slashing attacks on materialism and other evils. Her voice would now be listened to and recognized as speaking with authority.”

lotus-girl

In her will, HPB suggested that her friends might gather together on the anniversary of her passing (May 8, 1891) and read from poet Sir Edwin Arnold‘s The Light of Asia, and from the ancient Hindu scripture The Bhagavad-Gita.

Lotuses grew in unusual profusion in India on that day. May 8th became known as White Lotus Day ever since.

“That which men call death is but a change of location for the Ego, a mere transformation, a forsaking for a time of the mortal frame,” wrote her friend and colleague William Q. Judge

“a short period of rest before one re-assumes another human frame in the world of mortals.”

“The Lord of this body is nameless — dwelling in numerous tenements of clay, it appears to come and go. But neither death nor time can claim it, for it is deathless, unchangeable, and pure, beyond Time itself, and not to be measured.”

Continue reading

White Lotus Day

EVERY year on what is called White Lotus Day, May 8th, theosophists all over the world celebrate the anniversary of the passing of Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, founder of the Theosophical Society.

A world-famous figure of mystery and controversy and a leading intellect behind the occult revival in the West, Blavatsky published The Secret Doctrine in 1888 as her magnum opus.

“The time had now come when it was necessary to speak plainly about the real interpretation of the spiritualistic manifestations,” wrote Charles J. Ryan, an early student of Theosophy.

“H. P. Blavatsky had gained the attention of the public by her brilliant intelligence, the charm of her striking personality, and her slashing attacks on materialism and other evils. Her voice would now be listened to and recognized as speaking with authority.”

In her will, HPB suggested that her friends might gather together on the anniversary of her passing (May 8, 1891) and read from poet Sir Edwin Arnold‘s The Light of Asia, and from the ancient Hindu scripture The Bhagavad-Gita.

Lotuses grew in unusual profusion in India on that day. May 8th became known as White Lotus Day ever since.

“That which men call death is but a change of location for the Ego, a mere transformation, a forsaking for a time of the mortal frame,” wrote her friend and colleague William Q. Judge

“a short period of rest before one reassumes another human frame in the world of mortals.”

“The Lord of this body is nameless — dwelling in numerous tenements of clay, it appears to come and go. But neither death nor time can claim it, for it is deathless, unchangeable, and pure, beyond Time itself, and not to be measured.”

Continue reading

New Spiritual Patterns 1

Kids in the first Dutch cropcircle of 2010

ACTIONS that call upon our nobler mind and innate spirituality, will surely spark the growth of true self-knowledge within us.

Old intellect-driven habits of thinking and acting do not work, and naturally fade away of their own accord.

Spiritual motifs become more deeply ingrained in us as we serve others, Theosophy says, and practice genuine compassion for  humanity, and the planet.

“Help Nature and work on with her,” is one important way, says the Voice of the Silence, “and Nature will regard thee as one of her creators and make obeisance — she will open wide before thee the portals of her secret chambers, and

... lay bare before thy gaze the treasures hidden in the very depths of her pure virgin bosom.”

“Unsullied by the hand of matter she shows her treasures only to the eye of Spirit,” says the Voice — “the eye which never closes, the eye for which there is no veil in all her kingdoms.”

Fosbury nr Vernham Dean, Wiltshire, UK, July 17, 2010

“Self-knowledge of this kind is unattainable by what men usually call ‘self-analysis,’ Helena Blavatsky affirms, “it is not reached by reasoning or any brain process:

…it is the awakening to consciousness of the Divine nature of man.”

And “to obtain this knowledge is a greater achievement than to command the elements or to know the future,” she adds … Continue reading

Atlantis Ascending 2

MESSING with the unforgiving physical forces of nature challenging thirty-foot waves can be both exhilarating and deadly.

Similarly, ignorantly engaging paranormal forces and entities in black magic can have devastating personal consequences.

In our last post about the Atlanteans we touched on their increasing predilection to consciously develop and use powers of the dark side.

Another extreme behavior by the giants of those later day Atlanteans, the Teachings say, involved engaging in sex with animals.

Those unnatural sexual unions, The Secret Doctrine says, resulted in “lower races of men, now represented on earth by a few miserable dying-out tribes, and the huge anthropoid apes.”

Koko

Over long ages these behaviors irretrievably compromised the Atlantean spirituality. They were an ungodly mess in the end.

The final outcome of this was that the Atlanteans lost the power of their Third Eye, and nature sent many of that humanity for a long timeout to Davy Jones’ Locker.

The  mental and visual, psychic and spiritual perceptions of the Atlanteans lasted until nearly the end. Its functions, Blavatsky wrote,

“… owing to the materiality and depraved condition of mankind, died out altogether before the submersion of the bulk of the Atlantean continent.”

Continue reading

HPB: Spiritual Traveller

EVERY year on what is called White Lotus Day, May 8th  theosophists all over the world celebrate, the anniversary of the passing of Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, founder of the Theosophical Society.

A world-famous figure of mystery and controversy and a leading intellect behind the occult revival in the West, Blavatsky published The Secret Doctrine in 1888 as her magnum opus.

“The time had now come when it was necessary to speak plainly about the real interpretation of the spiritualistic manifestations,” wrote Charles J. Ryan, an early student of Theosophy.

“H. P. Blavatsky had gained the attention of the public by her brilliant intelligence, the charm of her striking personality, and her slashing attacks on materialism and other evils. Her voice would now be listened to and recognized as speaking with authority.”

In her will, HPB suggested that her friends might gather together on the anniversary of her passing (May 8, 1891) and read from poet Sir Edwin Arnold‘s The Light of Asia, and from the ancient Hindu scripture The Bhagavad-Gita.

Lotuses grew in unusual profusion in India on that day. May 8th became known as White Lotus Day ever since.

Continue reading

The Red Book

Reprinted from The Red Book by C. G. Jung (c) Foundation of the Works of C. G. Jung.

THOSE attracted to Theosophy and to Occultism are becoming every day more numerous. With every inquiry lies the potency and promise of genuine spiritual development.

The Masters of Wisdom in every age set up no barriers against any one’s approach. Their works and lives are not limited to adepts, saints, and the “purest of heart.”

The humblest searcher would not be made to feel discouraged by the sense of his own shortcomings, or by the perception of the difficulties at every step on his journey of self-realization.

This week we feature the work and life of one of the humblest and fearless of searchers, the renowned writer-artist-occultist-psychologist Carl Gustav Jung. The exhibit of his Red Book at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City ends January 25, 2010. Continue reading

Raja Yoga Dance

“And when Brahma produces the world anew… Collecting his mind into itself (Yoga willing), Brahma creates the four orders of beings …” (SD 1:456fn)

Temple of Apollo, Delphi

Temple of Apollo, Delphi

“Man, know thyself” read the inscription on the metope (MET-oh-pea) of the Apollo dedicated Oracular Temple at Delphi, its purpose being to remind any one entering the shrine of mysteries what the ultimate scope of his initiation (awakening) ought to be.

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The Pythia, Isis Unveiled

Self-knowledge is the core and ultimate end of initiation. It can be achieved through perpetual effort to become detached from sense effects and personal impressions through an ethical course representing the Divine Law on earth.

The means to fulfill this goal is the mind joined to the heart, a link which cements the physical level of existence with the spiritual. “Self-Knowledge is of loving deeds the child,” says The Voice of the Silence.

Patanjali, the greatest codifier of the system of Self-knowledge known as Yoga Sutras, says that “Concentration, or Yoga, is the hindering of the modifications of the thinking principle,” where Yoga is the union of the material to the spiritual, or the union of the opposites. Yoga means “union.”

Man’s major deed and success is considered the focusing of the mind steadily on one single point or concept, so gaining wisdom and deliverance from the cycle of rebirth, and this is known as meditation or self-knowledge.

Pilgrimage To Tibet

tibet2HPB’ s familiarity with Tibetan Buddhism as well as with esoteric Buddhist practices seems to be beyond doubt. A report by Margaret Cousins, “A pilgrimage in the Himalayas,” is confirmed by a Hindu sadhu, among other testimonies, that a Russian lady named Blavatsky had found the high teachers and received the Ancient Wisdom. (World Theosophy, Vol.1, Number 2, February 1930)

She managed to reach the hard-to-access Tibetan lamaseries after strenuous efforts, and hardships overcome with the help of her Masters. In a letter to an inquirer, who asked why she was sent to Tibet, HPB answered:

“True, there is absolutely no need of going to Tibet or India to find some knowledge and power ‘which are latent in every human soul’; but the acquisition of the highest knowledge and power require not only many years of the severest study enlightened by a superior intelligence, and an audacity bent by no peril, but also as many years of retreat in comparative solitude …” (see also The Extraordinary Life and Influence of Helena Blavatsky, by Sylvia Cranston, ch.6)

Buddha’s Secret Teachings

gautama1In many of the mountain lamasaries, Blavatsky writes in The Secret Doctrine, “there are subterranean crypts and cave-libraries, cut in the rock…” She continues:

“Along the ridge of Altyn-Toga, whose soil no European foot has ever trodden so far, there exists a certain hamlet, lost in a deep gorge. … Pilgrims say that the subterranean galleries and halls under it contain a collection of books, the number of which, according to the accounts given, is too large to find room even in the British Museum.”

Beneath his public moral teachings, she says, were instructions reserved for his disciples (Arhats.) These were taught “secret portions of the ‘Dan or ‘Jan-na‘ (‘Dhyan‘) of Gautama’s metaphysics,” and “received their Initiation at the famous Saptaparna cave.” HPB further explains:

Dan, now become in modern Chinese and Tibetan phonetics chan, is the general term for the esoteric schools, and their literature. In the old books, the word Janna is defined as “to reform one’s self by meditation and knowledge,” a second inner birth. Hence Dzan, Djan phonetically, the “Book of Dzyan.”

patanjali_11

Patanjali

These mystical Stanzas of Dzyan are those upon which Blavatsky based her entire The Secret Doctrine.

Yoga Training

Raja Yoga, as she called it, the ultimate yoga, differentiating it from Hatha Yoga, was the way in which she perceived and understood the esoteric knowledge she lived and wrote about.

She could never have provided an esoteric teaching had she not, beforehand, undergone a training concerning the secrets of nature and existence – and after long personal effort, practice and experience. To her personal students she recommended reviewing each day in detail, and keeping a mental “Daily Life Ledger” to aid in clearing away the hindrances to meditation.

Her knowledge on meditation can be traced throughout her writings. The Dhyana ability she possessed, referred to by Patanjali (Book 3) as “the continuance of the attention” also called contemplation.   By the word “Dhyana” is the knowledge of the mysterious laws of nature, and and what is obtained by Yoga training.

Trance

In the The Key to Theosophy , she says that wisdom can only be attained when in an ecstatic state— how the limited can get to know the limitless — cautioning that such a state cannot be reached through hypnotism, or physical and chemical means.

She viewed trances as harmful to the human psyche. It is rather conscious awareness that is required to reach godlike wisdom. In her teachings,  Mediums and Mediators and “The Dual Mind” and many others, she makes a strong effort to make obvious that the two aspects of human nature, as personality and individuality, are opposing aspects, and are expressed by different behaviors.

Ecstasy

Plotinus

Plotinus

One can only achieve true enlightenment through “ecstasy” as defined by Plotinus, and she quotes:

Real ecstasy was defined by Plotinus as “the liberation of the mind from its finite consciousness, becoming one and identified with the infinite.”

Meditation is silent and unuttered prayer or, as Plato expressed it, “the ardent turning of the soul toward the divine; not to ask any particular good (as in the common meaning of prayer), but for good itself — for the universal Supreme Good”

Plato

Plato

… Therefore, adds Plato, “remain silent in the presence of the divine ones, till they remove the clouds from thy eyes and enable thee to see by the light which issues from themselves, not what appears as good to thee, but what is intrinsically good.” (The Key to Theosophy)


The Raja Yoga Dance

dancer12In Blavatsky Collected Writings 6, on “The God Idea”, Mme. Blavatsky comments:

“…the highest Yoga is the concentration of mind upon God, even amidst the transaction of worldly affairs. This Yoga has been illustrated by a sloka given in my ‘Superiority of Hinduism,’ containing the beautiful comparison of the real yogi to a female dancer with a pitcher full of water upon her head, singing and dancing according to the strictest rules of music, but still preventing the pitcher from falling down. This best of all yogas, the real Raj yoga, is to be attained by long practice requiring constant and tremendous exercise of will-power as was done by Rajah Janaka.”

The initiation and tools she obtained at the Tibetan lamaseries, the fruits of inner knowledge, she in turn offered to humanity through her writings. They are the cornerstones of Theosophy.

Ironically, the first step towards initiation, given in The Voice of the Silence, is that: “the pupil must regain the child-state he has lost ere the first sound can fall upon his ear.” And we know how children love to dance!

Univeral Ethics

Practical Theosophy, referred to in The Key to Theosophy , is testimony to her belief in Ethics. The First Object of the Theosophical Movement, “To form the nucleus of a Universal Brotherhood of Humanity,” is the imprint of divine ethics onto our world.

Studying H.P.B.’s Diagram of Meditation, we can clearly detect the ethical purity the trainee must achieve;  to set himself free from mental propensities; to awaken the consciousness of the Higher Self.

Mme. Blavatsky’s thesis on meditation is strictly based on the initiation and practice learned in Tibet. It surely agrees with what many Yogis say — that for facilitating the state of ecstasy called Samadhi, one has to submit physically to the greatest abstinence in food and drink — and mentally into an incessant endeavor to purify and elevate the mind.

Aspasia Papadomichelaki

Athens ULT