Tag Archives: materialism

Modern Science and Our Moral Sense

????????????PRACTICAL Theosophy is not one Science, but embraces every science in life, moral and physical.

It is clear that modern science “believes not in the ‘soul of things,” H. P. Blavatsky wrote.  Yet, Science will be driven out of their materialist positions.

“Not by spiritual, theosophical, or any other physical or even mental phenomena, but simply by the enormous gaps and chasms that open daily — and will still be opening before them.”

“One discovery follows the other,” she noted, “until they are finally knocked off their feet by the ninth wave of simple common sense.

“If science is too ahead of its time, it must bide its time until the minds of men are ripe for its reception. Every science, every creed has had its martyrs.”

“Three decades ago, few scientists were courageous enough to break ranks and question their own belief system,” Deepak Chopra writes. “Even calling science a belief system sounded outrageous – religion is a matter of belief, science a matter of facts.”

science and religion

“Many scientists are unaware that materialism is an assumption,” writes controversial biologist Rupert Sheldrake one of the world’s most innovative biologists and writers, who is best known for his theory of morphic fields and morphic resonance —”they simply think of it as science, or the scientific view of reality, or the scientific worldview.

“They are not actually taught about it, or given a chance to discuss it. They absorb it by a kind of intellectual osmosis.”

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Evidence of an Afterlife, the Science of Near-Death Experiences

WHEN a neurosurgeon found himself in a coma, the medical doctor experienced things he never thought possible—a journey to the afterlife.

“Dr. Eben Alexander says he’s not the first person to have discovered evidence that consciousness exists beyond the body,” notes Newsweek Magazine in a feature article.

“Brief, wonderful glimpses of this realm are as old as human history.”

“Modern physics tells us that the universe is a unity—that it is undivided,” Dr. Alexander wrote in the Newsweek October 15 2012 cover story.

“Though we seem to live in a world of separation and difference,” he writes, “science tells us that beneath the surface, every object and event in the universe is completely woven up with every other object and event. There is no true separation.”

“In some sense man is a microcosm of the universe,” wrote David Bohm — legendary American quantum physicist known for his theory of an Implicate Order,” a universe of undivided wholeness—”therefore what man is, is a clue to the universe.”

cropped-lotus-in-the-pond.jpg

“We are enfolded in the universe,” Bohm says. Theosophy agrees. “We know of no eastern philosophy that teaches that ‘matter originated out of Spirit,’ Blavatsky wrote:

“Matter is as eternal and indestructible as Spirit and one cannot be made cognizant to our senses without the other—even to our, the highest, spiritual sense.”

Theosophy also asserts what neurologists and physicists are now beginning to verify — that there is no special location of consciousness in the brain. Consciousness exists throughout the brain, and the body.

The mind actually lives independently with its own energetic matrix interpenetrating the physical body, using the brain, heart and other organs and cells as its toolkit on this plane.

“Spirit got itself entangled with gross matter,” Blavatsky wrote in The Theosophist, “for the same reason that life gets entangled with the foetus matter. It followed a law, and therefore could not help the entanglement occurring.”

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Future Science: Discovering the Soul of Things

Jelena Momcilov

Jelena Momcilov “Magnet Girl”

MANY scientists like to think that science already understands the ways of the natural world.

For them the fundamental questions are answered, leaving only the details to be filled in.

The numerous impressive achievements of modern science seem to support this confident attitude.

But in recent research, including his own studies, frontier biologist Rupert Sheldrake believes otherwise.

His experiments reveal jaw dropping problems at the heart of physics, cosmology, biology, medicine and psychology. Similar to H. P. Blavatsky’s complaints about 19th century modern science.  Not much has changed since then, it would appear. Science still refuses to acknowledge “the soul of things.”

See: Connecting the Worlds of Science and Spirituality

Resolutely dismissive of paranormal findings or brain-free consciousness, traditional science asserts that matter is the gold standard. But even great authorities especially in modern science may be found to err, and scientific dicta are frequently influenced more by personal prejudice than rigorous research.

A pure impartial science always weighs “the laboriously acquired knowledge of the senses with the intuitive omniscience of the Spiritual divine Soul,” said H. P. Blavatsky, world Theosophy teacher.

Perspectives

As Hermes believed so does Theosophy, she wrote in The Secret Doctrine 1:296 that “knowledge differs from sense which is only of the physical world — but Knowledge is the end of sense which is only the illusion of our physical brain and its intellect.”

It is “self-contradictory, and simply absurd — from a scientific point of view, as much and even more than from the occult aspect of the esoteric knowledge.”

When the high priests of material science, she wrote, “resolve consciousness into a secretion from the grey matter of the brain, and everything else in nature into a mode of motion, we protest against the doctrine as being un-philosophical.” [And unscientific]

In a formal, conclusive and hilarious experiment he calls “Telephone Telepathy,” Rupert Sheldrake demonstrates that consciousness can indeed fly away on its own from one mind into another!

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Baring the Soul of Science

????????????PRACTICAL Theosophy is not one Science, but embraces every science in life, moral and physical.

It is clear that modern science “believes not in the ‘soul of things,” H. P. Blavatsky wrote.  Yet, Science will be driven out of their materialist positions.

“Not by spiritual, theosophical, or any other physical or even mental phenomena, but simply by the enormous gaps and chasms that open daily — and will still be opening before them.”

“One discovery follows the other,” she noted, “until they are finally knocked off their feet by the ninth wave of simple common sense.

“If science is too ahead of its time, it must bide its time until the minds of men are ripe for its reception. Every science, every creed has had its martyrs.”

“Three decades ago, few scientists were courageous enough to break ranks and question their own belief system,” Deepak Chopra writes. “Even calling science a belief system sounded outrageous – religion is a matter of belief, science a matter of facts.”

science and religion

“Many scientists are unaware that materialism is an assumption,” writes controversial biologist Rupert Sheldrake one of the world’s most innovative biologists and writers, who is best known for his theory of morphic fields and morphic resonance —”they simply think of it as science, or the scientific view of reality, or the scientific worldview.

“They are not actually taught about it, or given a chance to discuss it. They absorb it by a kind of intellectual osmosis.”

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Protecting our Noble Freedoms: The Truth about Vaccines, Big Pharma and Our Food

vaccinationbabies“YOUR great country I love so much for its noble freedom,” wrote the principal founder of modern Theosophy Mme. H. P. Blavatsky in addressing The Theosophical Society  Second Annual Convention in 1888.

“A large part of my heart and much of my hope for Theosophy lie with you in the United States, where the Theosophical Society was founded, and of which country I myself am proud of being a citizen.”

“You must remember that,” she added, “although there must be local Branches of the Theosophical Society there can be no local Theosophists; and just as you all belong to the Society, so do I belong to you all.” (H. P. Blavatsky Letter I — Second Annual Convention)

But not so fast. What would Mme. Blavatsky have said about this country if she lived today? Today at every level government interference in our individual freedoms has become epidemic. Does the government have the right, for example,  to force it’s citizens to choose between educating their children and vaccinating them?

remote-control-child

Mme. Blavatsky’s Adept Teachers made clear Their views on “evil”  (Letter 10). The ills of humanity fall into two main categories, they said. And the effects of such evils plays out every day in our individual and collective lives.

“Evil is the exaggeration of good, the progeny of human selfishness and greediness [are] nearly two thirds of the evils that pursue humanity ever since that cause became a power.”

In The Secret Doctrine  Mme. Blavatsky declares: “Practical Theosophy is not one Science, but embraces every science in life, moral and physical.” (Summing Up section of  The Secret Doctrine 1:269): but ….. “it is clear that modern science believes not in the ‘soul of things.”

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Karma: The Law of Empathy and Ethical Causation

Harold Copping, “The Widows Mite”

EVER mounting research reveals that you cannot separate your health from your emotions, explains Dr. Joseph Mercola, a prominent alternative medicine advocate.

“Numerous studies support the idea that having an upbeat and positive perspective,” he says, “can translate into living a longer healthier life.” This view aligns exactly with that of Theosophy.

Manifesting positive emotions and happiness “is perhaps one of the greatest gifts you have been given as a human being,” Mercola writes, “but to some extent, being happy is a choice you need to make.”

“Much like choosing to exercise or eat right. Happiness comes from within — it’s not meted out by circumstance alone.”

The Sanskrit word Karma has many meanings, and has a special aspect for almost every one of its manifestations according to Theosophy. As a synonym of sin, an action for the attainment of personal selfish desire, “it cannot fail to be hurtful” to almost everyone. 

altruism

Yet karma is also “the law of ethical causation,” Theosophical Pioneer William Q. Judge wrote. The effect of an act produced egotistically, against the great law of harmony, as opposed to that initiated by altruism instead of selfishness, cannot fail to be destructive.

In reality the condition is not inevitable. “No one has a right to say that he can do nothing for others, on any pretext whatever,” Theosophical pioneer H. P. Blavatsky explains in her Key to Theosophy. The poor widow in the Synoptic Gospels gives everything she had, she points out, while others give only a small portion of their own wealth: “A cup of cold water given in time to a thirsty wayfarer

“is a nobler duty and more worth than a dozen dinners given away, out of season, to men who can afford to pay for them.”

drinkofwater

Cold Water

Following Mme. Blavatsky’s death in 1891, an editorial published in the New York Daily Tribune (founded by Horace Greeley) said of her life and work: “Madame Blavatsky held that the regeneration of mankind must be based upon the development of altruism.”

“In this she was at one with the greatest thinkers, not alone of the present day, but of all time,” the Editorial acknowledged.

“And, it is becoming more and more apparent, at one with the strongest spiritual tendencies of the age. This alone would entitle her teachings to the candid and serious consideration of all who respect the influences that make for righteousness.”

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Dogs that Know When Their Owners are Coming Home

Science Set Free

“THREE decades ago, few scientists were courageous enough to break ranks and question their own belief system,” Deepak Chopra writes.

“Even calling science a belief system sounded outrageous – religion is a matter of belief, science a matter of facts.”

What follows are excerpts from Deepak Chopra’s recent article in the San Francisco Chronicle SFGate – Dr. Rupert Sheldrake’s top 10 list on Scientific Ideology – and H. P. Blavatsky’s “Ten Items” of natural law in Isis Unveiled (Vol. 2:588), called “the fundamental propositions of the Oriental philosophy.”

“The most far-seeing scientist who was willing to break ranks then, as now, was Rupert Sheldrake, who risked his impeccable credentials as a Cambridge biochemist with real joy, like a man suddenly able to breathe.

“Thirty years after his first heretical books, Sheldrake’s new one, ‘Science Set Free’ is a landmark achievement. No science writing has inspired me more.”

Deepak Chopra, San Francisco Chronicle

“Sheldrake’s essential point is that science needs setting free from ten blind dogmas. These dogmas embrace a true belief system as much as Roman Catholicism or any other faith. Behind the daily activity of gathering data, science assumes certain things about reality that, according to Sheldrake, are unsupportable.

“The first dogma, for example, holds that the universe is mechanical. If that is so, then everything in the universe is also mechanical, including human beings – or to use a phrase from the noted atheist Richard Dawkins, we are ‘lumbering robots.’

“From a scientist’s perspective, to understand everything that you need to know about human beings, you only have to tinker with all the mechanical parts of genes and the brain until there are no more secrets left.”

“Clearly such a view leaves no room for the soul, which becomes a wispy illusion that needs to be swept away. But then, so does the self, because there is no region of the brain that contains ‘I,’ a person.

“As long as ‘I’ is a hallucination formed by complex neural circuitry, one can throw out – or reduce to mechanical operations – love, beauty, truth, compassion, honor, devotion, faith, and so on, the whole apparatus that makes a person’s life feel valuable. A random universe has no purpose; therefore, giving lumbering robots a purpose is dubious.”

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