Tag Archives: mathematics

Angels in the Snow

SNOW angels, as far as we know, are only human-made depressions formed in an area of snow in the shape of an angel.

Snow angel making is a classic and fun winter child’s game — adults too can’t resist.

Nearly everyone living in northern latitudes knows about making “snow angels.” If you don’t, or haven’t, here’s the recipe.

The creation of the snow angel is easy. The first step is to find an undisturbed blanket of snow.

The next step is to lie on your back on the newly fallen snow, spreadeagled. Arms and legs are then swept back and forth, creating the winged shape.

The finished creation should have the appearance of an angel, the movement of the arms having formed wings, and that of the legs having formed the dress.

The trick is always to launch oneself carefully out of the newly formed impression without disturbing the design.

Then, if possible, take giant steps away minimizing any tell-tale footprints — leaving behind, for passers-by to marvel, a glistening angel dropped magically out of heaven!

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The Secret of Life

Positive_Energy_MAINSTREAM science creates an insurmountable obstacle to understanding the real nature of life because of one single belief issue.

Refusing to recognize life as a distinct force, science blocks all understanding of the nature of reality.

“The greatest problem of philosophy, is the physical and substantial nature of life,” H. P. Blavatsky wrote.

“It is its independent nature, which is denied by modern science—because that science is unable to comprehend it.”

“The reincarnationists and believers in Karma alone dimly perceive that the whole secret of Life is in the unbroken series of its manifestations: whether in, or apart from, the physical body.” 

The best definition of life that modern science can seem to come up with is Herbert Spencer’s old definition that defines the phenomenon, but gives no hint of its cause.

“Life is a definite combination of heterogeneous changes,” Spencer says, “both simultaneous and successive

in correspondence with external coexistences and sequences.”

This consensus is sustained because “most researchers still believe they can build from one side of nature, the physical,” says Biocentrist Dr. Robert Lanza who concludes, crucially: “without the other side, the living.”

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Murder for God 2

FEW honest and sincere believers have the faintest conception of the history surrounding the early beginnings of the Church.

Almost everyone is familiar with what is recorded in the New Testament concerning the differences of opinion that arose between Peter and Paul. But how many are aware of the fact that this split continued to grow?

For several centuries after the time of Jesus the best and most prominent of the Church Fathers were irreconcilably divided among themselves on issues of basic doctrine.

In order to retain power and authority, the dominant sectarians inaugurated a custom never before known in the recorded annals of religious history — the custom of anathema.

These Churchmen were too narrow and dogmatic in belief to allow room for natural divergences of opinion, which alone could have made of Christianity a vital and healthy organism. The result was a course of action diametrically opposed to the principle of tolerance reflected in the life of their declared inspiration, Jesus of Nazareth.

Having no faith in their capacity to win the adherence of thinking minds, the Church Fathers used anathema for the purpose of “persuading” those who could not be converted — and of silencing those not to be persuaded.

For the millennium “beginning with Buddha and Pythagoras at one end and the Neo-Platonists and Gnostics at the other, is the only focus left in History,” says Mme. Blavatsky in The Secret Doctrine — (see Holy Heretics) —

“… wherein converge for the last time the bright rays of light streaming from the æons of time gone by, unobscured by the hand of bigotry and fanaticism.” Continue reading

Murder for God 1

Rachel Weisz as Hypatia

THE fourth century was the turning point in the history of the Western world, the period in which Christianity took the form of a strong political organization.

Throttling the old religions, sciences and philosophies, “the Church” arose as a temporal power upon their remains.

At the same time, admiring crowds began gathering at the door of the academy where the learned and unfortunate Hypatia taught.

Hypatia, expounding the doctrines of the divine Plato and Plotinus, thereby impeded the progress of Christian proselytism.

She successfully dissipated the mists of the religious “mysteries” invented by the Christian Fathers, and was therefore considered dangerous.

H. P. Blavatsky writes in Isis Unveiled:

“This alone would have been sufficient to imperil both herself and her followers.”

The city of Alexandria is interesting to the Theosophical student, for there, just fifteen hundred years ago, existed the last great Theosophical School in history — the School which was begun by Ammonius Saccas, (called theodidaktos, or “god-taught”), and ended with the death of Hypatia. Continue reading

Angels in Winter

SNOW angels, as far as we know, are only human-made depressions formed in an area of snow in the shape of an angel.

Snow angel making is a classic and fun winter child’s game — adults too can’t resist.

Nearly everyone living in northern latitudes knows about making “snow angels.” If you don’t, or haven’t, here’s the recipe.

The creation of the snow angel is easy. The first step is to find an undisturbed blanket of snow.

The next step is to lie on your back on the newly fallen snow, spreadeagled. Arms and legs are then swept back and forth, creating the winged shape.

The finished creation should have the appearance of an angel, the movement of the arms having formed wings, and that of the legs having formed the dress.

The trick is always to launch oneself carefully out of the newly formed impression without disturbing the design.

Then, if possible, take giant steps away minimizing any tell-tale footprints — leaving behind, for passers-by to marvel, a glistening angel dropped magically out of heaven!

Continue reading

Fields of Dream

WHEN our rational brains are all heated up, arguing life’s complexities, that’s usually the best time to kick off our shoes and give it a rest.

“Ever drifting down the stream, lingering in the golden gleam,” Lewis Carroll wondered: “Life — what is it but a dream?”

At times, when we are faced with a critical decision, or stuck on a complex problem, sleeping or napping on it, researchers find, often leads to the right answer.

The notes of a song, the smell of burning leaves, the babbling of a mountain stream, a day-dream—all can open a door to the the non-rational, poetic mind. They can also arouse unexpected vistas when we are children.

In Wordsworth’s haunting poem “Ode on Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood,” those reveries opened for him an unexpected awareness of past lives.

This post was updated and republished at:

Dreaming the Future