Tag Archives: Mozart

The Psychology of Reincarnation: Prodigious Prodigies

Emily Bear

EMILY BEAR is a pianist and composer from Rockford, Illinois. Wikipedia explains:

“When Emily was 2 years old, her grandmother recognized her talent at the piano. Bear began to study with Emilio del Rosario at the Music Institute of Chicago.

“Within 4 years she was enrolled for study of classical music at the Winnetka campus.

“Bear started to compose her own music at the age of three. At 8 years, she has already composed more than 350 pieces – and much of her work – both composition and improvisation – is of the more difficult, 20th Century genre, inclusive of Jazz elements.”

Below, a Six-year old Emily Bear has wowed audiences from the White House to her own house. Playing the piano since age 3, Emily also composes her own music. Has WGN-TV discovered the next Mozart? Or, possibly, the former Mozart?

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The Soul’s Tapestry: Look Inward, thou art Buddha

julia-butterfly-hillDISCERNING the how and why of human uniqueness, from the likes of Mozart to the fearless passion of Julia Butterfly Hill, is always perplexing.

Lacking the seer’s knowingness, we’d be forced to trudge for clues into the intricate threads of reincarnations, and sift the karmic sands of countless past lives.

Teilhard de Chardin’s idea that we are “spiritual beings immersed in a human experience,” barely begins to explain the innate genius of a Mozart composing music score at age three.

Or why Julia, at twenty-four years old, would choose to spend a dangerous two years alone atop a giant forest redwood, protecting it from hostile, clear-cutting loggers.

We all sport a convincing sense of individual identity, a persistent ‘I am I and no other’ consciousness, and an eternal soul that hovers, hawk-like — silently and all-seeing — soaring sure-eyed above the Salton Sea of each new personality.

Salton Sea

Trauma patients with memory loss are convinced of their egoity, even if they don’t remember who in the world they are. Amnesiacs forget their own name, family, email, and favorite movie and food—yet their sense of ‘I’ persists.

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Hands of Healing

Morea_Garcia

Morea Garcia

PARISIANS including Marie Antoinette, the wife of King Louis XVI, were in love with a man by the name of Franz Friedrich Anton Mesmer.

The Paris press reported the phenomenon as “Mesmeromania.”

The gregarious Dr. Mesmer was wealthy because he married a rich widow, but also because he became a successful Viennese physician.

He lived on a well-appointed estate, and often hosted a twelve-year-old musical prodigy named Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Mozart was introduced to Benjamin Franklin’s invention, the “Armonica,” by Mesmer, (who used it to ‘mesmerize’ his patients.)

The young Mozart composed a musical piece for Mesmer’s “Glass Armonica,” and later wrote a solo Armonica piece, and a larger quintet for Armonica, flute, oboe, viola and cello.

Mesmer was the darling of Parisian Elite Society in the 1780’s, a confidant of the super rich and super powerful.

Ω

All over Paris, people were throwing themselves under trees Mesmer had ‘mesmerized.’ They would flail, convulse, scream and claim healing. Mesmer said he had a healing power in his hands he called “Animal Magnetism.”

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Heal Thyself

PARISIANS including the wife of King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette, were in love with a man by the name of Franz Friedrich Anton Mesmer.

“Mesmeromania” is how the Paris press reported it.

Dr. Mesmer was rich in part because he married a rich widow, but also because he became a successful Viennese physician.

He lived on a well-appointed estate and hosted the then young twelve-year-old musical prodigy, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Mozart was introduced to Benjamin Franklin’s invention, the “Armonica,” by Mesmer, (who used it to ‘mesmerize’ and heal his patients.)

The young Mozart composed a musical piece for Mesmer’s “Glass Armonica,” and later wrote a solo armonica piece, and a larger quintet for armonica, flute, oboe, viola and cello.

Mesmer was the darling of Parisian Elite Society in the 1780’s, a confidant of the super rich and super powerful.

Ω

All over Paris, people were throwing themselves under trees Mesmer had ‘mesmerized.’ They would flail, convulse, scream and claim healing. Mesmer said he had a healing power in his hands he called “Animal Magnetism.”

Continue reading

Thou Art Buddha

Photo: barrywheeler.net

DEDICATED repetition is the foundation of all accomplishment in true art, science, and even spiritual development.

Yet success may entail much more than just ‘practice, practice’ to get to Carnegie Hall, as the saying goes.

Sweat, talent and technical skill are of course required. But the intuitive musician has a growing sense of  how a composition ought to be performed.

She is able to increasingly embrace the intent of the composer while shaping the music into a unique performance of her own.

Becoming ‘free of the keyboard’ an accomplished artist is untied from the written score and physical instrument.

The shift signals an artist who has the required technical mastery, plus an inspiration of her own.

Yet in large orchestras, the conductor communicates directions to musicians during a performance, becoming the authoritative guide, interpreter, and dedicated amanuensis of the composer.

Not unlike the Buddha following his enlightenment, an orchestra conductor, or music instructor, has transformed herself into a guru to the searchers, coaxing them through their envelope of inexperience, to ever increasing emancipation.

They say that when a student is ready, the teacher will appear. Spiritual knowledge and development does require commitment and dedication to an ideal, but on a grander scale. Achievement is more demanding any art, religion, science or philosophy for it is the synthesis of them all.

“Practical Theosophy is not one Science,” Blavatsky explained, “but it embraces every science in life, moral and physical. It may, in short, be justly regarded as the universal ‘coach,’ — a tutor of world-wide knowledge and experience.”

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Stepping Stones

Photo: barrywheeler.net

DEDICATED repetition is the foundation of all accomplishment in true art, science, and even spiritual development.

Yet success may entail much more than just ‘practice, practice’ to get to Carnegie Hall, as the saying goes.

Sweat, talent and technical skill are of course required. But the intuitive musician has a growing sense of  how a composition ought to be performed.

Because, through an inner  transformation, she can embrace the intent of the composer, and transform the music into an exhilarating inspiration of her own.

The accomplished performer is not tied to notes on paper, becoming what is called ‘free of the keyboard.’ That shift signals an musician who not only has the required technical mastery, but is also ready to shape a performance in her own inspired way.

Yet in large orchestras, the conductor communicates directions to musicians during a performance, becoming the authoritative guide, interpreter, and dedicated amanuensis of the composer.

Not unlike the Buddha following his enlightenment, an orchestra conductor, or music instructor, has transformed herself into a guru to the searchers, coaxing them through their envelope of inexperience, to ever increasing emancipation.

They say that when a student is ready, the teacher will appear. Spiritual knowledge and development does require commitment and dedication to an ideal, but on a grander scale. The stakes are higher than any one art or science.

“Practical Theosophy is not one Science,” Blavatsky explained, “but it embraces every science in life, moral and physical. It may, in short, be justly regarded as the universal ‘coach,’ — a tutor of world-wide knowledge and experience.”

Continue reading

Healing Hands

MESMEROMANIA is how the Paris press reported it.

Parisians including the wife of King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette, were in love with a man by the name of Franz Friedrich Anton Mesmer.

Dr. Mesmer was rich in part because he married a rich widow, but also because he became a successful Viennese physician.

He lived on a well-appointed estate and hosted the then young twelve-year-old musical prodigy, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Mozart was introduced to Benjamin Franklin’s invention, the “Armonica,” by Mesmer, (who used it to ‘mesmerize’ his patients.)

The young Mozart composed a musical piece for Mesmer’s “Glass Armonica,” and later wrote a solo armonica piece, and a larger quintet for armonica, flute, oboe, viola and cello.

 

Continue reading