Tag Archives: Saint Francis

Hidden Powers of Animals

THIS was such a popular post, we decided to republish it. Many people think that animals are just instinctual machines, but the assumption is false, and many controlled studies prove it.

Investigators discover that humans are not the only beings with self-aware minds, free will, and paranormal powers. There are powerful spiritual and intellectual forces hidden in animals.

Chimps, as will be shown, were found to be smarter than humans in computerized memory tests. But, in the 17th Century, René Descartes, dubbed the “Father of Modern Philosophy,” started everyone off on the wrong paw.

His materialism was not lost on H. P. Blavatsky. “Descartes held the living animal as being simply an automaton,” she noted in the article Have Animals Souls — “a ‘well wound up clock-work,’ according to Malebranche,” and she countered:

“One who adopts the Cartesian theory about the animal, would do as well to accept at once the views of the modern materialists.”

Koko and Tabby

A woman who clearly did not subscribe to the Cartesian theory, found a young lion injured in the forest on the brink of death. She took it home with her and nursed it back to health.

Later she made arrangements with an animal rescue group to take the lion.

Some time passed before the woman had a chance to visit. A video was taken when she walked up to the lion’s cage to see how he was doing. Watch the lion’s reaction when he sees her!

Continue reading

What Animals Feel

ANIMALS are just instinctual machines, most people believe. But it’s not true.

 Controlled scientific studies suggest there are powerful spiritual and intellectual forces embedded in the kingdoms of nature.

In the 17th Century, René Descartes, dubbed the “Father of Modern Philosophy,” started us thinking the wrong way.

“Descartes held the living animal as being simply an automaton,” H. P. Blavatsky comments in her article Have Animals Souls — “a ‘well wound up clock-work,’ according to Malebranche” — to which she countered:

“One who adopts the Cartesian theory about the animal, would do as well to accept at once the views of the modern materialists.”

Koko and Tabby

A woman who clearly did not subscribe to the Cartesian theory, found a young lion injured in the forest on the brink of death. She took it home with her and nursed it back to health.

Later she made arrangements with an animal rescue group to take the lion.

Some time passed before the woman had a chance to visit. A video was taken when she walked up to the lion’s cage to see how he was doing. Watch the lion’s reaction when he sees her!

Continue reading

The Fires of Mind

ANIMALS are only instinctual machines, most people believe. But its not true.

 Controlled scientific studies suggest there are powerful spiritual and intellectual forces embedded in the kingdoms of nature.

 

In the 17th Century, René Descartes, dubbed the “Father of Modern Philosophy,” started us thinking the wrong way.

 

“Descartes held the living animal as being simply an automaton,” H. P. Blavatsky comments—”a ‘well wound up clock-work,’ according to Malebranche“—to which she countered:

 

“One, therefore, who adopts the Cartesian theory about the animal, would do as well to accept at once the views of the modern materialists.”

§

Koko and Tabby

A woman found a young lion injured in the forest on the brink of death. She took it home with her and nursed it back to health. Later she made arrangements with a animal rescue group to take the lion. Some time passed before the woman had a chance to visit. This video was taken when she walked up to the lion’s cage to see how he was doing. Watch the lion’s reaction when he sees her!

Continue reading

The Human Spark

ANIMALS are only instinctual machines, many believe. But as animal advocates attest, there is a palpable spiritual and intellectual substance to the kingdoms of nature.

Science is slowly acknowledging the fact. But the 17th Century, René Descartes, dubbed the “Father of Modern Philosophy,” started us thinking the wrong way round.

“Descartes held the living animal as being simply an automaton,” H. P. Blavatsky notes — “A ‘well wound up clock-work,’ according to Malebranche” — adding with cutting sarcasm:

“One, therefore, who adopts the Cartesian theory about the animal, would do as well to accept at once the views of the modern materialists.”

This post has been revised and updated.
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The Fires of Mind

Sweet and Wild

sparrow61

What is it about our encounters with nature that thrills us so? Those tidbits of bliss, egoless moments, swept up in mysterious and profound wild.

On an unusually warm day in autumn, Amish organic farmer David Kline came upon a woodchuck napping by a tree. “Taking my walking stick,” he says, “I reached out and gently scratched its back. Instead of waking, as I expected it to, the woodchuck arched its back in appreciation; its movements seemed to say: ‘Ah, that feels good.’”

Biodynamic farmers often note a response in wildlife on their farms after applying biodynamic preparations that, in a sense, feed and nourish the forces of nature and earth.

In working with biodynamic and other healing methods for trees in my yard, the response from nature always astounds me: a fox greeting me as I walked out my back door and bald eagles flying overhead, singing, after I had treated one particular tree.

I live in an area surrounded by woods, so these encounters are more “natural” given the setting. But I had one encounter years ago with a bird at the Mall of America in Minnesota that I will never forget.

I had just finished shopping and was walking down the steps of a parking ramp when I noticed a sparrow flying into a Plexiglas wall trying to get out. I tried to catch it in my shopping bag, to no avail. I said a little prayer to Saint Francis.

Then I looked at the bird and said, “Look, you’re not going to get out of here without my help, so you’re going to have to cooperate.” The bird then jumped on the top of my shopping bag, which I was holding out to it, and we proceeded down another flight of steps.

Once we got to the entrance, I said to the sparrow, “Now you can go.” It flew happily away. A guy by the entrance watching the whole thing said, “Boy, are you lucky.”

A few weeks ago, I came home after a medical procedure, feeling pretty somber. It was night, and I heard a sound outside the back door so I flipped on the lights. There, just a few yards away, three baby raccoons were climbing around a tree.

After a few moments, they came down continuing to snack on birdseed I had dropped on the patio. They were incredibly cute. Then one came up my steps and looked at me through the screen door, as if to ask, “Are you okay?”

Sweet and wild.

"Are you okay?"

"Are you okay?"

© Kara LeBeau 2008. All rights reserved for text and above photo.

“Thou hast to become as one with Nature’s Soul-Thought. At one with it thou art invincible. All Nature thrills with joyous awe and feels subdued; the silver star now twinkles out the news to the night-blossoms, the streamlet to the pebbles ripples out the tale; dark ocean-waves will roar it to the rocks surf-bound, scent-laden breezes sing it to the vales, and stately pines mysteriously whisper: “A Master has arisen, a MASTER OF THE DAY.”

-The Voice of the Silence