Tag Archives: spiritual brain

This Reincarnated Baby Needed to Speak

This experience was memorialized by the Australian psychic Nicole Cody, on her Cauldrons and Cupcakes blog:

“OKAY, so I’m a psychic.  No secret there.  It’s an odd thing to be in our mostly rational and scientific world, but I’ve come to accept who I am and I live in a way that honours this energy within me.

“Does it define me?  Sometimes.  But I am also more than this particular skillset – and I certainly don’t foist my abilities on the unsuspecting. If people need me, I trust that they will come to me.

“I can’t turn off this flow of psychic information, but I have learned to manage it, so that most of the time it is just background noise. That’s why yesterday rattled my cage a little. During a break I went to a local cafe.  It was quiet and I was the only patron.

 After a while a mother and father entered, with their baby in a pram. The parents were tired and fractious. I looked up only to see who had come into the room, and then went back to my pot of chai and my book.

“Suddenly I had the feeling of being stared at.  I looked up, and into the intense blue eyes of a young baby boy sitting in a highchair – he had craned around to see me. I smiled and then kept reading.  He kept staring. After a while his mum became frustrated with him and kept guiding his attention back to their table.  He kept cranking himself around to stare at me.  It began to get a little weird.

“Finally I left. As I stood at my car the family walked past me. As soon as the little boy saw me he began crying and reaching for me. A series of images flashed through my mind. The mother stopped pushing the pram and her child stopped crying.  

“She started walking and he began to scream, reaching for me, his face turning a mottled purple from his efforts. Help me, I heard his voice in my mind. Tell them.  

His mum stopped again, distressed, and I walked the few steps over and took her child’s outstretched hand. He stopped crying and smiled at me.

“’I don’t know what’s come over him,’ said the baby’s mum. ‘He’s never behaved like this before.’

“’I’m sorry,’ I said, although I did not know why I was apologising.  Before I knew it I’d opened my mouth again.  ‘Your husband’s having trouble sleeping.’  I said it as a fact, knowing I was right.

“’Yes,’ she said.  ‘For months now. Nightmares.  He won’t tell me what about.’

“The images came to my mind thick and fast as her baby son clutched my hand.  Two young boys, barely more than toddlers. Tousle-haired twin brothers. A farm. A gun. A terrible accident.

“’I’m a psychic,’ I said.  ‘Your baby is communicating with me.  He wants your husband to know that he is Jamie.’  It all came out in a rush.  ‘He’s Jamie and it’s all okay and he loves him enormously.’

“‘I wanted to call our baby James, but my husband wouldn’t let me,’ she said. Her voice took on an edge of hysteria. ‘Did I call him the wrong name?’

“Her baby began to scream. The woman slumped against my car, and her husband came running over. ‘Tell him what you just told me,’ she said, in tears, trying to comfort her infant son, who was still gripping tight to my hand.

Crying baby in pram

 “Now I felt beyond awkward, but I repeated what I had said.

“’How can I believe you?’ the man said angrily. I thought he might hit me.

“This is why I don’t do this stuff, I was silently reminding myself, wishing I was anywhere but here…

“I lowered my voice so only he could hear me, briefly explained the images I had seen, and gave him the words in my head – the name of the farm, the year, the make of the car and its colour, the checkered red and black wool rug on the front seat, his own name, and the name of his brother who died in the accident; James.

“Now this big tattooed man began to cry. Through his tears he told me his story. Jamie was this man’s twin brother, killed twenty-six years ago when the boys found a loaded rifle on the front seat of their father’s car. The gun had discharged as they played with it.

“The man had begun having nightmares about the incident he barely remembered from shortly after his wife had conceived.  

He thought it was because he somehow didn’t deserve to be a father – that he might put his child into danger, or fail to protect his child somehow. He had never told his wife about this tragedy from his childhood – the family had never spoken of it again.

“’I always thought he had the same eyes as my brother,’ the man said.  ‘Does he forgive me?’ he asked.

“I nodded. ‘It was an accident.  He wants to be with you now, he wants you as his Dad.  He chose you both. He loves you so much he did all he could to come back and be with you.’

“’Hello mate,’ said his dad. Then he gave the baby a big hug.

“’He won’t remember,’ I continued.  ‘By the time he can talk he will have forgotten who he is.  He’ll just know he’s your son. But he needed you to know.  He needed you to have peace.’

“The baby stopped crying as I stopped speaking. He let go of my hand. Within a minute he was asleep.

“The family walked off, arm in arm, peaceful. They didn’t say anything else to me. They didn’t look back. I stood lonely, depleted and shaken at my car for a moment, and then got in and drove home.  Message delivered.

“Such is my life…

“PS – I felt compelled to google the words ‘James’ and ‘reincarnation’ a little after writing this blog post and I found this. I thought you might find it interesting too.” ♥

My Three Brains

Hamlet

Laurence Olivier in “Hamlet”

THOUGHT and consciousness itself is assumed by most neuroanatomists to be created by and located entirely in the physical brain, neatly tucked away inside our skulls.

This insistent worldview is only reinforced by our body language when we always describe thinking by pointing to our heads.

But native cultures never engaged in such assumptions. The traditional Native American view always considered the heart to be the center of thought and motive, pointing to it when referring to thinking.

Then there are those familiar ‘gut-feelings’ we often have. Those compelling instincts, studies show, are more often than not, intuitional signals, even so far as foretelling of some future event. “Two brains may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but they make literal and evolutionary sense,” NY Times writer Harriet Brown says. But three brains? That does seem a stretch.

Yet in Theosophy brains can number into the billions. Every cell and organ has a consciousness of its own. The physical heart  also functions as a powerful “brain.”

As stated in The Secret Doctrine (1:274): “Everything in the Universe, throughout all its kingdoms, is consciousi.e., endowed with a consciousness of its own kind and on its own plane of perception.”

Universal Atom

And in her article “Kosmic Mind” H. P. Blavatsky wrote:  There is “consciousness in every universal atom . . . every atom is a little universe in itself; and every organ and cell in the human body is endowed with a brain of its own, with memory, therefore, experience and discriminative powers.”

“Groundbreaking research in the field of neurocardiology has established that the heart is a sensory organ and a sophisticated information encoding and processing center, with an extensive intrinsic nervous system sufficiently sophisticated to qualify as a “heart brain.” (Neurocardiology-Anatomical and Functional Principles, by J. Andrew Armour, M.D., Ph.D.)

“Heart-Brain”

Confirming this triune constitution Mme. Blavatsky explained “there exists in Nature a triple evolutionary scheme . . . or rather three separate schemes of evolution, which in our system are inextricably interwoven and inter-blended at every point. These are the Monadic (or spiritual), the intellectual, and the physical evolutions. . . . Each of these three systems has its own laws.” [Corresponding to heart, brain and gut] (The Secret Doctrine 1:181).

[Like the heart], “the enteric nervous system [the gut] must assess conditions, decide on a course of action and initiate a reflex.  And does all this on its own, with little help from the central nervous system.”

Richard Wagner’s Götterdämmerung

Undeterred, most neuroscientists continue to diligently barrel along cataloging what they insist are ‘the neural correlates of consciousness’ in the brain, and seem determined to prove that these neurons are the sole authors of our thoughts and feelings, isolated exclusively in the fatty workshop between our ears.

This consensus view dictates that when we die everything we are or learned disappears forever — including our soul and our individual ‘I am I’ consciousness. But this reductionist view of mind and consciousness is losing favor with many research scientists on the leading edge today, and may be about to radically change.

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Mystery of the Afterlife

PSYCHE in occult Greek philosophy was the organ or vehicle of the nous, the higher ego or reembodying spirit.

The caterpillar lives its period, making for itself a chrysalis, which after a stage of dormancy is broken by the emerging butterfly.

As an analogy of spiritual evolution this implies the potentiality of soul growth for all beings, and of an earthbound humanity becoming aerial, uniting with spirit.

These thoughts led the ancient Greeks to use the butterfly as a symbol of the human soul (psyche); and in their mythology Psyche was in consequence represented in art with butterfly wings.

Seven year old Kristine loved to take her daydreams outside. One day during her dreamy wanderings she noticed a Monarch Butterfly who appeared to have a hurt wing and couldn’t fly.

“I decided I must help her!” Kristine wrote. “Putting her on my shoulder I took her home and announced I was going to heal her back to full health. My parents didn’t tell me I ‘couldn’t’ although I heard them discuss how heartbroken I would be if the Butterfly didn’t live.

“My Mom helped me gather up what we thought a Butterfly would eat and we made a grassy nest next to my pillow on my bed, and she stayed right there at night while I slept. During the day I would take her outside for fresh air and to see if she could fly yet…a week went by, my parents were seen shaking their heads.

“Then a few more days went by and while outside she suddenly flew off my shoulder…she flew up and away.

ζ

butterfly-hands

“And then I cried, happy that she could fly again, sad that she was gone. However as I turned for one last look in the last direction she flew in, I felt a brush across my cheek.

“Ms. Butterfly had come around the other side of me, to give me what my Mother always called ‘Butterfly Kisses.’ My tears turned into a grateful smile. My love for all of God’s miracles of being has never left me.” – Kristine Kamp-Adante, (Courtesy of Northwest Animal Healing & Intuitive Communication)

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Miracle Mind

CONSCIOUSNESS is still considered, by most neuroscientists, to be located and created entirely in our physical brain tucked safely inside our skulls.

This persistent worldview is only reinforced by our body language: we always describe thinking by pointing to our heads.

But native cultures never engaged in such ignorant skullduggery. The traditional Native American view always considered the heart to be the center of thought and motive.

Confusing matters more are those familiar ‘gut-feelings’ we often have. These  compelling instincts, studies show, are more often than not signal accurate intuitions, even foretelling of some future event.

Continue reading

Conscious Without A Brain

CONSCIOUSNESS is still considered, by most neuroscientists, to be located and created entirely in our physical brain tucked safely inside our skulls.

This persistent worldview is reinforced by our body language in describing thinking, by people pointing upward to their heads.

But native cultures never engaged in such scientific skull-duggery.

The Native American view, according to tradition, always deferred with hand over the heart to that revered organ as the real seat of the moving force thought.

Ritual divination, mythical Norn, and crystal ball were not required.

Confusing matters even more are the familiar ‘gut-feelings’ we often have, seeming thoughts that recent studies show are more often than not accurate depictions of a situation, condition, person’s character, or even foretelling of some future event.

Undeterred, many neuroscientists continue to diligently catalog what they insist are ‘the neural correlates of consciousness’ in our brain, and seem determined to prove those billions of correlates are the creators of our thoughts and feelings, located exclusively in the fatty workshop between our ears.

In their view when we die everything disappears forever — including our soul and our individual ‘I am I’ awareness. But this reductionist view of mind and consciousness is losing favor with many research scientists on the leading edge today, and is about to radically change.

Continue reading