Tag Archives: sympathy

Temples of Initiation

LONG before the digital age, before computers, smart phones and social media were vogue, ancients sages had wirelessly transmitted secrets to their disciples.

They introduced to them to the invisible realms of nature and mind, unknown to the general public.

That realm of nature served and still serves as a living psychic interface between man’s consciousness and living forces of spiritual influence.

That same knowledge was revealed to the world by Mother of the New Age H. P. Blavatsky in her first major work — Isis Unveiled: A Master Key to the Mysteries of Ancient and Modern Science and Theology — a work begun in 1875 with the founding of the Theosophical Society in New York City.

The first 1,000 copies of Isis Unveiled were sold in 10 days, and received numerous favorable reviews. The New York Herald called it “one of the remarkable productions of the century,” while The New York Independent said “The appearance of erudition is stupendous.”

The Egyptian goddess Isis is the ideal mother and wife as well as the patron of nature and magic. Originally Issa, the goddess Virgin-Mother, personified nature, according to The Theosophical Glossary, in Egyptian or Koptic Uasari, the female reflection of Uasar or Osiris. She is the “woman clothed with the sun” of the land of Chemi [Egypt].

Isis commanded unseen entities of immense influence. It was an invisible world of nature not copyrighted by Microsoft or Intel, a knowledge first transmitted by Nature’s hidden all-wise spiritual overseers, encoded with evolutionary blueprints for the advancement of spiritual humanity.

The invisible entities, called “elementals” or “elementaries” in modern Theosophy, are  orbs of influence in the sense that they attach to thoughts and emotions. They preserve hidden patterns of intention secreting them upon persons to whom they become unknowingly attached.

They are the preservers and deliverers of Karma. Many have experienced an unmistakable sense of prior knowing a certain person or place—though the encounter is seemingly, in this life,  for “the first time.” The déjà vu occurs probably with a push from those unseen entities.

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Hearts in Healthcare

compassionTHE ancient Wisdom Religion, now called Theosophy, provides a compelling basis for ethics and compassion.

The binding force lies in the realization that humanity shares one divine root, that all are united both in the natural world and at the deepest spiritual level.

The teaching shows that “compassion is no attribute” that it is the “Law of Laws,” (Voice of the Silence) — “the law of love eternal.”

The mutual brotherhood and altruism such compassion demands are the ideals we must follow if humanity is to survive and thrive. Fortunately, The Golden Rule is found in all the world’s faiths, and is more universal than most of us know or were taught.

“The ethic of reciprocity is found in the scriptures of nearly every religion,” says A Comparative Anthology of Sacred Texts. The Golden Rule “is often regarded as the most concise and general principle of ethics, a condensation in one principle of all longer lists of ordinances.”

Dalai_Lama_Louisville_2013

Charter for Compassion International

“The latest advances in neuroscience paint a rich picture of the deep interconnection between human beings: our feelings, sensations, thoughts, emotions, physiological responses, and visceral reactions are intimately linked.

“It’s as if we have a broadband network connection between our respective nervous systems.”

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Orbs of Influence

angel-singing

Euterpe

DEJA VU is an awakened familiar reminiscence of place, or in the case of meeting a stranger, an uncanny feeling of recognition.

We have an unmistakable sense of prior knowing that person or place — though the encounter is seemingly, in this life,  for “the first time.”

Invisible entities called “elementals” or “elementaries” in Theosophy, can be thought of as “orbs of influence,” in the sense that such hidden entities attach to and manifest hidden patterns of intention.

They are attracted to, mirror and preserve fields of information — reflecting the  influences, beneficent or maleficent, of persons, places and things. The Greeks called them Muses.

Similarly, “sacred space” and “spirit of place” are ideas that, for man, refer to a lingering spiritual resonance of certain locations. Continue reading